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47th Annual Conference | April 19 – 22, 2017 | Minneapolis, MN USA | Hyatt Regency Minneapolis Hotel | #UAA2017 | urbanaffairsassociation.org | urbanaffairsassociation.org/conference/

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Wednesday, April 19
 

7:00am

Cornell University Press (Discounts on urban studies titles and more!)
Meet Sr. Editor Michael McGandy at the Cornell University Press tables and get exclusive UAA discounts on our fantastic urban studies titles. Download our PDF flyer for more information!
 
Follow Michael McGandy on Twitter @michaelmcgandy
Follow Cornell Press on Twitter @CornellPress
http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/


Wednesday April 19, 2017 7:00am - 7:15am
Mirage (2nd Floor)

7:00am

8:00am

8:00am

Wednesday - Graduate Student Workshops (Pre-approved participants only)
IMPORTANT: All accepted workshop participants must pick-up conference badge and materials at registration check-in (Regency - 2nd Floor) before reporting to the workshop.


Workshop Coordinator:

Jocelyn Taliaferro, North Carolina State University


Facilitators:
Martine August, Rutgers University
Susan Clarke, University of Colorado
Prentiss Dantzler, Colorado College
William Holt, Birmingham-Southern College
Maria Martinez-Cosio, University of Texas Arlington
Ali Modarres, University of Washington-Tacoma
Michael Leo Owens, Emory University
Corianne Scally, The Urban Institute
Jocelyn Taliaferro, North Carolina State University
Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University
Bethany Welch, Aquinas Center Philadelphia
Margaret Wilder, Urban Affairs Association


Wednesday April 19, 2017 8:00am - 5:45pm
Greenway Ballroom-A (2nd Floor)

11:30am

12:45pm

Tour 1: Nonprofit Housing Development in the Twin Cities
Tour Date: Wednesday, April 19, 2017
Tour Time: 1pm – 5pm
Tour Leader(s): Neeraj Mehta, Director of Community Based Programs, Center for Urban and Regional Affairs, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota
Pre-departure Meeting Time: 12:45pm
Pre-departure Meeting Location: Hotel lobby of the Hyatt Regency Minneapolis Hotel
Ticket price: $25 (USD)
Tour Capacity: 25 participants
Click here to purchase tour ticket!
 

The Twin Cities have a very active nonprofit sector working on affordable housing and community development.  This tour will highlight two recent notable projects completed by local community development corporations, PPL and Hope Community. We will meet with staff from both CDCs and tour their developments.

PPL’s Hawthorne EcoVillage is strengthening this north Minneapolis neighborhood, creating an environmentally-friendly community with wide appeal while addressing crime, foreclosure and property abandonment. PPL has brought its expertise in housing and community development to help create and implement the EcoVillage’s long-term plans.

In 1999, Hope envisioned rebuilding all four corners of a long-abandoned intersection in the Phillips neighborhood, just one mile south of downtown. There was significant skepticism about changing this high traffic, drug-ridden area of Minneapolis. Undaunted, Hope put together a strategic partnership with non-profit developer Aeon. Their vision of a diverse, multi-cultural community is becoming a reality. Learn more about the project’s history.

  • Hope has developed and rehabbed nearly 300 units of high-quality rental and homeownership housing, from studios to large three-bedroom units.
  • Ample green space, semi-private courtyards, and children’s play spaces invite residents and neighbors to gather and strengthen community ties.
  • The intersection marks a gateway not only to downtown Minneapolis, but to a vibrant future for this diverse urban neighborhood.


Wednesday, April 19, 1pm – 5pm
Pre-departure Time: 12:45pm
Pre-departure Location: Hotel Lobby of the Hyatt Regency Minneapolis Hotel

Additional tour details:
Arrive at 1:15pm at First Stop Hope Community 611 East Franklin Ave. Minneapolis, MN
Tour of Hope until 2:15pm.
Depart Hope and Arrive at PPL Hawthorne Eco Village at 2:45pm.
Tour and Discussion of Eco Village until 4pm.
Return to hotel by 4:30pm.



Wednesday April 19, 2017 12:45pm - 5:00pm
Meet in conference hotel lobby at 12:45pm

12:45pm

Wednesday - Mobile Study Tour (Ticket Required)
Pre-departure time & location for ALL tours:
12:45pm in the Hotel Lobby of the Hyatt Regency Minneapolis Hotel

Tour 1: Nonprofit Housing Development in the Twin Cities
Tour Leader: Neeraj Mehta, University of Minnesota
Date and Time: Wednesday, April 19, 2017, 1pm-5pm

This tour will highlight two recent notable projects completed by local community development corporations, Project for Pride in Living (PPL) and Hope Community. We will meet with staff from both CDCs and tour their developments.

Price: $25 (USD)


Wednesday April 19, 2017 12:45pm - 5:00pm
Meet in conference hotel lobby at 12:45pm

4:00pm

6:30pm

 
Thursday, April 20
 

7:00am

7:00am

Cornell University Press (Discounts on urban studies titles and more!)
Meet Sr. Editor Michael McGandy at the Cornell University Press tables and get exclusive UAA discounts on our fantastic urban studies titles. Download our PDF flyer for more information!
 
Follow Michael McGandy on Twitter @michaelmcgandy
Follow Cornell Press on Twitter @CornellPress
http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/


Thursday April 20, 2017 7:00am - 6:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor)

7:00am

7:00am

7:10am

7:15am

TH7.15.01 Twenty-First Century Chicago
Twenty-First Century Chicago published its Second Revised Edition in July, 2016. It investigates the social, economic, political, and governmental conditions of Chicago in this century. While traditional anthologies on urban politics comprise stilted journal articles that place far too much emphasis on statistics, this anthology adopts a unique approach. Although it does incorporate the writings of preeminent scholars on the city of Chicago, the focus is on first-hand accounts: speeches by politicians, newspaper stories, editorials by journalists, memoirs and biographies and little known research reports advocating change. In our breakfast round table, we seek to meet with scholars from other cities to take our work to the next level: Twenty-First Century Cities. Using the framework that we have established in Twenty-First Century Chicago, they would put together a similar anthology to be published on their city.

Speakers
CM

Constance Mixon

Director of Urban Studies; Associate Professor of Political Science, Elmhurst College
MM

Melissa Mouritsen

College of DuPage


Thursday April 20, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:15am

TH7.15.02 Automated Vehicles and the Future Governance of Urban Mobility
There is an active contemporary debate about how emerging technologies for automated vehicles might revolutionise individual and collective mobility in cities. As with any socio-technical transition of such importance to both economic prosperity and societal wellbeing, there are critical questions to be posed in terms of how the transition is managed, and how both the benefits and any negative externalities of change will be governed. The state, public institutions, city planners and managers and other participants in the wider arena of public policy need to pro-actively plan for the era of automated vehicles in order to ensure societally-desirable outcomes. To achieve this, a new set of governance challenges – encompassing changing networks of actors, resources and power, new logics of consumption, and shifts in how urban mobility is regulated, priced and taxed – will require to be successfully negotiated. This session will discuss paper the key potential impacts and externalities of the automated mobility to which urban governance will need to respond, and discuss what policy interventions might be appropriate to help manage the transition.

Speakers
ID

Iain Docherty

Professor of Public Policy and Governance, University of Glasgow


Thursday April 20, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:15am

TH7.15.04 The Role of Urban Green Spaces in the Quest to Achieve Environmental Justice: A Research Update
As scholars document a disproportionate burden of environmental concerns in low-income and racially/ethnically diverse communities, several research and policy approaches are being utilized to understand and address this issue. Environmental justice involves the fair treatment and involvement of all people in environmental decision making regardless of factors such as race, ethnicity, and income. However, since additional aspects of place (i.e. other than proximity to pollution sources) can influence health and well-being, access to environmental amenities such as urban green spaces have become a forefront issue in the present dialogue on environmental justice. As achieving environmental justice plays a key role in urban health and sustainability, this continues to represent a major area for research. This breakfast roundtable will highlight major findings in the literature as it relates to urban green spaces and environmental justice, particularly in the United States. Along with key findings from the scholarship, this roundtable will discuss research gaps and case studies that illustrate the opportunities and challenges with incorporating urban green space projects at the local level.

Speakers
VJ

Viniece Jennings

Biological Scientist, USDA Forest Service


Thursday April 20, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:15am

TH7.15.05 Reframing Policy Questions Towards Equitable School Funding Models: What Will Be the Magic Words?
The majority of public schools are funded by property taxes; those that are not sit on a historical foundation of such a funding model. Thus, there is an established cyclical relationship between race, property value, and school quality. In places with non-residential school choice policies, affluent (predominantly white) parents have greater ability to access high-quality educational opportunity than non-affluent (predominantly non-white) parents. In places without school choice policy, parents who can invest in property within high-performing school districts or enroll in private institutions effectively manufacture and implement their own system of school choice that excludes non-affluent families from equal opportunity.  Discussion questions: The onus for obtaining access to high quality education in urban settings is currently on parents. Given that parents will consistently choose the immediate best interests of their child over those of a sustainably equitable educational system, how can policy be leveraged to shift the onus for institutional change off of parents and on to state level government? What policy questions must be addressed in order to disrupt these reproductive cycles and move towards equity in school funding systems? Is it possible to frame arguments for equitable funding such that it does not result in prohibitive resistance from affluent communities?

Speakers

Thursday April 20, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:15am

TH7.15.06 Rethinking the Meaning of Livable Communities: Academic Perspectives
Roger Caves, San Diego State University

This breakfast roundtable will present perspectives from a group of academics from across the US on the topic of livable communities. The development of such communities is becoming an important part of community development, urban design, policy planning and urban affairs. With the desire by urban scholars throughout N. America and Europe to move from communities that are often described as sterile and boring places to live, it is important to understand the factors that make communities livable. This roundtable will discuss what has gone wrong in many communities and will offer suggestions for making them more livable. Moreover, the discussion will focus on rethinking the meaning of livable communities.

Speakers
RC

Roger Caves

San Diego State University


Thursday April 20, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:15am

TH7.15.03 Breakfast Roundtable for UAA Institutional Members
Roundtable Discussion for Institutional Members to share information and opportunities for UAA to assist them.
Organized by the UAA Membership Committee

Speakers

Thursday April 20, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:15am

TH7.15.07 Show Me the Money: Finding New Sources of Support for Urban Research Centers
This Breakfast Roundtable will be a moderated discussion of how urban research centers are responding to cutbacks in government, university and foundation funding for their activities. Participants will be asked to share their experiences with respect to where they have looked for new sources of funding. The intention of this session is to learn from each other's experiences and expand urban research being conducted at centers across the country. The prospects for collaborations between and among centers will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for William M. Rohe

William M. Rohe

Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor and Director, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Affordable housing, central city and neighborhood revitalization


Thursday April 20, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

8:05am

Thursday Opening Plenary Session: Pursuing Regional Equity in the Twin Cities (For details in printed program, refer to Program Highlights section in table of contents)
Speakers
avatar for Alondra Cano

Alondra Cano

Ninth Ward City Council Member, City of Minneapolis
When she was elected, Alondra said this to Minnesota Public Radio: “My entire life, I’ve worked on efforts to make sure the diverse communities of Minneapolis and Minnesota were engaged, empowered and served by the various institutions that govern us.” She added, “I’m humbled... Read More →
avatar for Gary Cunningham

Gary Cunningham

President and CEO, Meda
For more than 20 years, Gary L. Cunningham has served as the top leader of philanthropic, health care, public policy, and educational organizations. Gary joined Meda as President and CEO in August 2014. Meda’s proven market-based solutions address racial economic inequities by fostering... Read More →
avatar for Jason Sole

Jason Sole

President, Minneapolis National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
Jason Marque Sole is a former drug dealer, leader of a notorious street gang, and a three-time convicted felon. The middle of three children, Jason was raised on the mean streets of Chicago by a father who was addicted to cocaine and an overburdened mother left to pick up the pieces... Read More →

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 8:05am - 9:05am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

9:09am

9:10am

TH9.10.02 Claiming Neighborhood, New Ways of Understanding Neighborhood Change
Despite serious criticisms of Human Ecology especially since the 1960s, neighborhood analyses and policies continue reproducing and reifying this approach. This includes assumptions about racial change and income mixing as well as conceptualizing neighborhood stability and health. An emerging literature on neighborhoods throughout the USA has started carving new paths towards critical analyses that inform theory and other policies and actions especially for disadvantaged and underrepresented populations. On occasion of the publication of the book Claiming Neighborhood, New Ways of Understanding Urban change, this colloquy will discuss these new paths in the context of our changing urban space and the transformations associated with the reconfiguration of capitalism in the last three decades. This topic is particularly critical today as cities polarize between gentrified neighborhoods of abundance and opportunity and distressed neighborhoods of scarcity and exclusion. Examining and neighborhood change from a critical perspective, the colloquy argues that the traditional approaches to neighborhood analyses and policy making need to be challenged if we are to represent appropriately the causes of residents of neglected neighborhoods towards a more just city.

John J. Betancur, University of Illinois at Chicago
Susan Saegert, City University of New York
Janet Smith, University of Illinois at Chicago

Speakers
avatar for Janet Smith, University of Illinois at Chicago

Janet Smith, University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois Chicago
SS

Susan Saegert

City University of New York

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Greenway Ballroom-B (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.26 What Are Book Editors and Publishers Looking For? Ask Them!
Senior editors from top publishers talk candidly about book publishing for academic authors.  Unique opportunity to ask questions of knowledgeable and experienced book editors. 

Michael McGandy, Cornell University Press (Moderator)
Douglas Hildebrand, University of Toronto Press
Pieter Martin, University of Minnesota Press
Fredric Nachbaur, Fordham University Press
Juliana Pitanguy, Springer Publishing

Speakers
avatar for Douglas Hildebrand

Douglas Hildebrand

Director & Publisher, University of Alberta Press
avatar for Fredric Nachbaur

Fredric Nachbaur

Director, Fordham University Press
As publisher of the Polis: Fordham Series in Urban Studies, I am searching for authors in fields as diverse as American Studies, Anthropology, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Urban Studies and who can write for both academic and informed lay audiences. Our objective is... Read More →
avatar for Juliana Pitanguy

Juliana Pitanguy

Springer Publishing
My name is Juliana Pitanguy and I am Associate Editor at Springer in the Netherlands. I develop the urban studies and urban geography program, inviting interest in publications and encouraging participation.

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
St. Croix (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.01 Activist Scholarship Special Session: Housing as a Right and Critical Questions about Services for the Homeless
This panel is an Activist-Scholar Special Session. Panelists examine the international question of whether housing is a right, and the relation of that question to increasing levels of homelessness; the hardships created by complex contracting systems required of non-profits that are providing homeless services since neoliberal restructuring; and the social ethics of using “tiny homes” as a homeless intervention.

The Right to Housing: The Significance of its Recognition as Public Policy and Efforts to Implement It
William Dennis Keating, Cleveland State University 

Tiny Homes for the Homeless: A Feel-Good Solution with Strings Attached
Kathryn Terzano, University of Utah

Where’s the Love? Understanding how complex contracting systems can cause hardships for systems aimed at reducing homelessness in Philadelphia
Lauren Mittenberger, Villanova University

Speakers
WD

William Dennis Keating

Emeritus Professor, Levin College of Urban Affairs, Cleveland State University
Housing and Community Development

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Greenway Ballroom-E (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.03 Housing Across the Lifecourse: Aging and Mobility
The Influence of Elderly Residential Mobility on Residential Satisfaction in the Seoul Metropolitan Area
Mi Namgung, Pusan National University; Hee-Jung Jun, Sungkyunkwan University; HeeYong Choi, Sungkyunkwan University

Understanding the Residential Location Choices of Older Adults
Jaclene Begley, Ryerson University; Sewin Chan, New York University

An Exploration of Subsidized Grandfamily Housing in the United States: What Works 
Ela J. Rausch, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis; Marilyn J. Bruin, University of Minnesota

Aging and Housing: Perspectives of African American Females
Marilyn Bruin, University of Minnesota; Deborah Mitchell, University of Minnesota

Speakers
MB

Marilyn Bruin

University of Minnesota
ER

Ela Rausch

Senior Project Manager, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Greenway Ballroom-A (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.05 Shaping the Visions of Infrastructure: Coalitions and Discourses
Coalitions, Ambitions, and Visions: Transportation Politics in Toronto, 2003-2017
Sara Hughes, University of Toronto

The Devil Made Them Do It: Explaining the Popular Rejection of Urban Transportation Funding in Vancouver
Michael Oram, Simon Fraser University; Anthony Perl, Simon Fraser University

Discursive Dynamics in Arena Development Projects
Stacy-Lynn Sant, University of Michigan; Daniel S. Mason, University of Alberta

Speakers
SH

Sara Hughes

University of Toronto
MO

Michael Oram

Simon Fraser University
avatar for Stacy-Lynn Sant

Stacy-Lynn Sant

Assistant Professor, University of Michigan

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Lakeshore B (1st Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.07 Sports in the Entrepreneur City
The Purpose Behind Repurposing? A Case Study of Edmonton’s Northlands Coliseum
K. Meaghan Carey, University of Alberta; Daniel Mason, University of Alberta

Mapping the Success of Sports Districts: A GIS-based Analysis of Urban Development Outcomes in 26 US Arena Districts
Stephanie Gerretsen, University of Michigan; Mark Rosentraub, University of Michigan

Regime Theory v. Public Choice: How Best to Explain Why Governments Pay for Sport Venues
Stephanie Gerrestsen, University of Michigan

Ninety Percent Mental and the Other Half is Physical: Minor League Baseball Stadiums as Redevelopment Anchors
Eric Joseph van Holm, Georgia State University and the Georgia Institute of Technology

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Gerretsen

Stephanie Gerretsen

Doctoral Student, University of Michigan
avatar for Eric Joseph van Holm

Eric Joseph van Holm

Georgia State University and Georgia Institute of Technology

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Nicollet Ballroom D-1 (1st Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.08 Groups and Institutions of Civil Society as Sustainability Agents
Institutions as Possible Agents of Sustainable Development in Unequal Societies: The Contrasting Case of Two Museums in Rio de Janeiro
Cassia Silva, Universidade Federal Fluminense; Lucia Capanema-Alvares, Universidade Federal Fluminense

For the Public Good? Exploring the Determinants of Organizational Effectiveness in Community-based Sustainable Development
Nathaniel Wright, Texas Tech University

Seeking Sustainability in Brazil: Urban Institutional Capacity for Guiding the Transition
Allison Bridges, Rutgers University

Speakers
AB

Allison Bridges

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
LC

Lucia Capanema-Alvares

Professor, Universidade Federal Fluminense
avatar for Nathaniel Wright

Nathaniel Wright

Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University
Dr. Nathaniel Wright received his B.A. and Masters of Public Administration from Binghamton University (2005, 2006); and Ph.D. in Public Administration from the University of Kansas (2014). Dr. Wright conducts research on the role that social advocacy nonprofits play in creating sustainable... Read More →

Moderators
LC

Lucia Capanema-Alvares

Professor, Universidade Federal Fluminense

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Greenway Ballroom-G (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.10 Exploring the Complexity of Economic Development in Diverse Contexts
Does Metropolitan Fragmentation Affect Regional Economic Performance? Evidence from Canada
Patrick Kilfoil, McGill University; Jean-Philippe Meloche, Université de Montréal

Economic Development Management: University-Industry Innovation Exchange via State-Funded Web Portals
Iryna Lendel, Cleveland State University

Human Rights, Governance and Public Policy to Counter the Structural Problems and Brain Drain in Latin America and Haiti
Moïse Lindor, Universidad del Valle de Tlaxcala

Inner City Revitalization and Urban Sprawl – Does Framing Determine Policy?
Annette Steinacker, Loyola University Chicago

Collaborative Economic Development: Transaction Risk and Network Structures
Jered Carr, University of Illinois, Chicago; Michael Siciliano, University of Illinois, Chicago; Drew Westberg, Coe College; Christopher Hawkins, University of Central Florida

Speakers
JC

Jered Carr

University of Illinois at Chicago
avatar for Patrick Kilfoil

Patrick Kilfoil

Ph.D. Candidate, School of Urban Planning, McGill University
avatar for MoÏse Lindor

MoÏse Lindor

PROSESSOR-RESEARCHER, Universidad del Valle de Tlaxcala, México
Ph. D in Regional Development /Agricultural labor migration, Multidimensional poverty & Public policy analysis
avatar for Iryna Lendel, Cleveland State University

Iryna Lendel, Cleveland State University

Assistant Director, Center for Economic Development, Cleveland State University

Moderators
avatar for Iryna Lendel, Cleveland State University

Iryna Lendel, Cleveland State University

Assistant Director, Center for Economic Development, Cleveland State University

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Nicollet Ballroom D-2 (1st Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.11 Technologies and Mythologies of Mobility
In this session we explore the ways in which different mobilities constitute and disrupt spaces and their borders. How do mobilities enable particular freedoms, become dangerous, transgress social norms, inform aspirations, and ultimately enable city dwellers to participate in place-making? What are the different kinds of technologies that enable mobility and how do these become wrapped in particular urban myths of speed, efficiency, sustainability and excitement? The panel will speak to the ways in which different forms of mobility and immobility interact to produce different outcomes for differently gendered, classed and ethnicized bodies. It will look at how individual and spatial identities get constructed through the production and enactment of particular cultural, everyday and long-distance mobilities. In addressing these question the members of this panel seek to open up ways of unpacking the mobile and its potential for producing opportunities as well as constraints in the urban. The members of this panel have been involved in research on mobilities in different urban regions across South Asia.

Wake Up! Hyderabad: An Analysis of Road Safety Campaigns
Sneha Annavarapu, University of Chicago

The Ladies Compartment: Producing Space and Negotiating Mobility in a Women-only Crowd
Aditi Aggarwal, University of Illinois at Chicago

Transnational Mobilities and Cosmopolitan Place-Making in Kathmandu, Nepal
Benjamin Linder, University of Illinois at Chicago

Gender and Informality Within the Mumbai Suburban Railway system
Lauren Dean, University of Illinois at Chicago



Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Lakeshore C (1st Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.12 The Limits of Charter Schools and School Choice
Challenging the Market Logic of School Choice: A Spatial Analysis of Charter School Expansion in Chicago, IL
Ashley Baber, Loyola University, Chicago; Chris Poulos, University of Illinois Chicago; Stephanie Farmer, Roosevelt University

Education Policy with Urban Implications: How School Choice in Michigan has Disadvantaged the Lansing School District
Tanner Delpier, Michigan State University

Why Community Development Lenders Support Charter Schools, Even When the Communities they Serve may not
Julia Sass Rubin, Rutgers; Katherine Nelson, Rutgers

Speakers
avatar for Julia Sass Rubin, Rutgers

Julia Sass Rubin, Rutgers

Associate Professor, Rutgers
Julia Sass Rubin, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University and an Associate Visiting Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. She also is one of the founding members of Save Our Schools... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Julia Sass Rubin, Rutgers

Julia Sass Rubin, Rutgers

Associate Professor, Rutgers
Julia Sass Rubin, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University and an Associate Visiting Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. She also is one of the founding members of Save Our Schools... Read More →

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Greenway Ballroom-H (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.13 Activist Scholarship Special Session: Innovating and Organizing for Racial Justice in Education
Racial justice organizing, innovation, and education has many dimensions and locations. These panelists have studied and participated in the struggle for local control of a primarily African-American school district in New Jersey; an insider-outsider educational experience in a prison.

Cash Rules Everything Around Me: Oakland Natives Use a Revolutionary Approach to Incentivize School Attendance
Kimberly Mayfield, Holy Names University

Empowering Communities in East Tennessee: The Role Scholars and Universities Play in the Pursuit of Social Justice
Ken Chilton, Tennessee State University; Anthony Campbell, Tennessee State University; Kyujin Jung, Korea University

Beyond Effectiveness: Local School Boards and Racial Justice
Stephen Danley, Rutgers University

Prison as a Classroom: Collaborative Learning About Urban Inequality
Aditi Mehta, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Justin Steil, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Danley

Stephen Danley

Associate Professor, Rutgers-Camden University
avatar for Aditi Mehta

Aditi Mehta

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Kimberly Mayfield Lynch, Holy Names University

Kimberly Mayfield Lynch, Holy Names University

Dean- School of Education, Holy Names Univeristy
Kimberly Mayfield is an Associate Professor and Dean of the School of Education at Holy Names University. She received her doctorate in Learning and Instruction from the University of San Francisco. Her research interests and activism include creating a permanent diverse teaching... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Kimberly Mayfield Lynch, Holy Names University

Kimberly Mayfield Lynch, Holy Names University

Dean- School of Education, Holy Names Univeristy
Kimberly Mayfield is an Associate Professor and Dean of the School of Education at Holy Names University. She received her doctorate in Learning and Instruction from the University of San Francisco. Her research interests and activism include creating a permanent diverse teaching... Read More →

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Greenway Ballroom-J (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.14 Local Non-Profit Organizations as Service Providers
Faith, Poverty, and Place: Congregations and the Geography of Poverty in the US
Jessica Gillooly, University of Michigan; Scott Allard, University of Washington

City Council Member Attitudes Toward Nonprofit Policy Roles and Assessments of Nonprofit Capacity in Small Wisconsin Communities
Douglas Ihrke, University of Wisconisn-Milwaukee; Michael Ford, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

Educational Attainment and Equitable Access to Employment in the Nonprofit Sector
Jodi Benenson, University of Nebraska Omaha

From Margin to Center: Local Nonprofit Organizations, Economic Development, and Regime Politics
Patricia Tweet, St. John Fisher College

Networks and Perceptions in Asset Mapping for a Community Collaborative
Megan Gilster, University of Iowa; Cristian Meier, University of Iowa

Speakers
avatar for Jodi Benenson

Jodi Benenson

Assistant Professor, School of Public Administration, University of Nebraska Omaha
Jodi Benenson is an Assistant Professor in the School of Public Administration at the University of Nebraska Omaha. Her research focuses on the intersection between civic engagement, inequality, and social policy, specifically as these topics pertain to activities in the nonprofit... Read More →
DI

Douglas Ihrke, University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Moderators
DI

Douglas Ihrke, University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Greenway Ballroom-I (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.16 Parks and Dumps, Traffic and Memories: The Historical and Material Embededness of Urban Planning
The urban public realm provides stark visual evidence of inequalities patterned along the lines of class, ethnicity, and race, and it provides insight into the structures of economic, political, and social power that underlie these inequalities. The public realm can also play a significant role in reproducing structures of power. At the most basic level, the quality and availability of public amenities, services, and infrastructure affect the physical, mental, and social health of urban communities. Although people are continually (re)shaping and (re)making the public realm from the bottom up, through activities that range from mundane everyday uses and practices to overt political action, they do so in relation to regulatory frameworks. This panel investigates the regulatory structures that govern aspects of the urban public realm in terms of three key dimensions: first, how the regulatory frameworks have been produced; second, how these frameworks have evolved; and third, how they have shaped the functioning and possibilities of the public realm (i.e., whose interests are served in the public realm and whose are not, and what opportunities exist for bottom-up influence over the realm).  By illuminating the regulatory practices that underpin aspects of the urban public realm, the panel advances planning approaches that help to empower disadvantaged groups, remedy urban inequalities, and thereby contribute to a more just city.

Power and Environmental Justice
Raysa Martinez Kruger, Rutgers University

Choice as Ideology, Technology and Practice
John West, Ball State University

Heritage Properties and the Evolving Properties of Heritage: The Case of the South Street Seaport
Juan J. Rivero, New York University

From Times Square to Coney Island: The Changing Role of Demographics in Public Space Planning
Alex Reichl, Queens College

Speakers
AR

Alex Reichl

Queens College, CUNY
avatar for John West

John West

Assistant Professor of Urban Planning, Ball State University
My research focuses on how economic theory has influenced the ways that city governments engage with urban residents, and how technology mediates this relationship. I study transportation, education and public health policy in New York City. In practice, I am interested in discovering... Read More →

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Lakeshore A (1st Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.17 Migration, Mobility and Population Dynamics in China
Displacement and Replacement: Socio-Spatial Mobility in Chinese Urban Sustainability Experiments
I-Chun Catherine Chang, Macalester College

China's Age and Gender Specific Population Inter-Provincial Migration Patterns
Yiping Fang, Portland State University

Urbanization in Shanghai: Multi-national Urban Issues
Ming Yin, Washington University in St. Louis

What Drives Peri-urbanization in Suburban Area of China’s Mega-cities: A comparative study of Suzhou and Chengdu
Chen Chen, Tongji University; Richard LeGates, Tongji University

Speakers
CC

Chen Chen

Assistant Professor, Tongji University
Chen Chen is Assistant Professor at College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Tongji University. He specializes in urbanization, urban and regional development, urban economics, and quantitative spatial analytics. Chen Chen got his Bachelor, Master and Ph.D. from Tongji University... Read More →
avatar for Yiping Fang

Yiping Fang

Assistant Professor, Portland State University
Migration, housing inequality, China, Urbanization.
MY

Ming Yin, Washington University in St. Louis

Washington University in St. Louis

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Greenway Ballroom-D (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.25 Issues in Historic Preservation: Tax Credits and Historic Districts
Advocating Historic Housing Tax Credits to Individuals who own and live in Pre-1960 Housing to Assist in Alleviating Housing Affordability
Daphine G Foster, Jackson State University

Mixed Motivations: Historic Districts and Neighborhood Change in the District of Columbia
Riordan Frost, American University

Who Benefits? The Distribution and Concentration of the Baltimore Historic Tax Credit
Aaron Passell, Barnard College

Speakers
avatar for Daphine G Foster

Daphine G Foster

Board Chair, Calling Panther Heritage Foundation
I am a retired IBMer. Since retiring I have pursued and achieved the three things I always wanted to do but was too busy until I retired. First, I established a non-profit dedicated to history and culture. Secondly, I earned my PHD in Urban and Regional Planning from Jackson... Read More →
avatar for Riordan Frost

Riordan Frost

American University
avatar for Aaron Passell

Aaron Passell

Associate Director, Urban Studies, Barnard College
Historic preservation, gentrification, sustainability, urban development

Moderators
avatar for Aaron Passell

Aaron Passell

Associate Director, Urban Studies, Barnard College
Historic preservation, gentrification, sustainability, urban development

Thursday April 20, 2017 9:10am - 10:35am
Greenway Ballroom-C (2nd Floor)

10:35am

10:49am

10:50am

TH10.50.01 Activist Scholarship Special Session: Activist Approach to Housing Policy
Papers in the panel will consider global incidences of housing policy and inequality, from both a praxis and theoretical perspective, in order to inform best practices for housing accessibility. The panel will investigate diverse identities to forward a more holistic understanding of needed activism in the face of inequality and injustice.

Raising the Minimum Wage and Housing Affordability
Lauren Nolan, University of Illinois at Chicago; Allison Dickson, University of Illinois; Janet Smith, University of Illinois at Chicago

Reinvestment Ideology: Challenging Conventions about the Inevitability of Reinvestment as Gentrification
Anne B. Shlay, Georgia State University; Christian Noakes, Georgia State University

Community in the Face of Planning: Social Workers as Street-Level Agents of Social Justice
Yinnon Geva, Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Gillad Rosen, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Housing as a Key to Women's Right to the City
Marie-Eve Desroches, Urban Studies - National Institute of Science Research

Speakers
avatar for Marie-Eve Desroches

Marie-Eve Desroches

PhD Student, Institut National de Recherche Scientifique
avatar for Yinnon Geva

Yinnon Geva

PhD student, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
AB

Anne B. Shlay

Georgia State University

Moderators
KG

Karen Gibson, Portland State University

Associate Professor, Toulan School of Urban Studies & Planning, Portland State University

Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Greenway Ballroom-A (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.02 Preserving Safe and Affordable Housing
The papers in this panel consider the challenges associated with maintaining safe and affordable housing for lower and moderate income residents. The authors discuss these challenges through various types of housing in different contexts. The effect is to present the multiplicity of affordable housing types, challenges to safe and affordable housing and strategies to preserve it. The papers address mobile home communities, multifamily federally assisted urban housing, financialization and multi-family housing in the US and Canada. The authors discuss the varied housing stocks, challenges to long-term safety and affordability, and the strategies communities use to preserve safe and affordable housing. The contributors explore these questions: As the physical plant of housing ages and neighborhood and policy contexts change, what types of properties have remained affordable and to whom? What challenges safety and affordability? How have the buildings and the communities within them addressed challenges to remain safe and affordable? The questions come at a critical time as housing makes up an increasingly large share of household expenditures and many cities struggle with a lack of affordable housing.

Preserving Mobile Home Communities Through Nonprofit and Community Land Trust Ownership
Renia Ehrenfeucht, University of New Mexico; Beth Sorce, Grounded Solutions Network

Picking Battles with Buildings: Discretion, Governance, and the Social and Physical Characteristics of Building Inspections
Robin Bartram, Northwestern University

Origins and Adaptations of FHA-Insured Urban Multifamily Housing, 1938 - Present Nicholas Shatan, Rutgers University; Kathe Newman, Rutgers University

Preserving Affordability? Financialization of Multi-Family Housing in Toronto and Tenant Strategies to Stay Put
Martine August, Rutgers University

Speakers
RB

Robin Bartram

PhD student, Northwestern University

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Greenway Ballroom-B (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.03 Housing Policy at the Local Level: the Role of Local Decisions and Decision-Makers
A Tale of Two Localities: Analyzing Rental Assistance Constraints in Alexandria and Arlington, Virginia through Path Dependence
Adam R. Justus, George Mason University; Katrin B. Anacker, George Mason University

Affordable for Who? New York City’s Affordable Housing Plan Under Mayor De Blasio and the Limits of Local Initiative in Addressing Shelter Poverty

Alex Schwartz, The New School

Federal Initiative to End Homelessness in the Era of Devolution: Homeless-exclusionary Local Preference Systems in the Housing Choice Voucher Program
Huiyun Kim, University of Michigan

Speakers
AR

Adam R. Justus

George Mason University
avatar for Alex Schwartz,The New School

Alex Schwartz,The New School

Professor, The New School

Moderators
avatar for Alex Schwartz,The New School

Alex Schwartz,The New School

Professor, The New School

Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Greenway Ballroom-C (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.04 What Prevents Vulnerability? Policy and Diverse Communities
Operationalizing Urban Resilience: Living with Water in Rotterdam
Billy Fields, Texas State University; Liliane Geerling, HZ University

Building Local Resilience: Hazard Mitigation Plan Implementation in Coastal North Carolina
Anuradha Mukherji, East Carolina University

The Strategies for Promoting the Built Community’s Disaster Prevention Capability Based on RATA Resilience Evaluation System 
Yuxiao Jiang, Tianjin University; Yingxia Yun, Tianjin University; Lingjun Meng, Tianjin University; Lijian Ren, Tianjin University; Mengyu Zhan, Nankai University

Speakers
AM

Anuradha Mukherji

Department of Geography, Planning, and Environment, East Carolina University

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Greenway Ballroom-D (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.05 Understanding the Values Behind Infrastructure Investments
Do Municipal Bond Elections Privilege Certain Infrastructure Investments over Others?: The Case of San Antonio, Texas
Jacqueline Peterson, University of Toronto

Why Are We Lagging Behind? An Empirical Analysis of Capital Spending in U.S. Cities
Wen Wang, Rutgers University - Newark; Yonghong Wu, University of Illinois at Chicago

Are Overlapping Local Governments Competing With Each Other When Issuing Debt?
Spencer Brien, Naval Postgraduate School; David Swindell, Arizona State University

What Drives Urban Infrastructure Investment in American Cities? A Panel Data Analysis
Yanbing Han, Florida International University

Can Business Dollars Advance Social Equity? How Public and Private Objectives Collide in the M-1 Rail Streetcar Project in Detroit
Joe Grengs, University of Michigan; Kate Lowe, University of Illinois at Chicago

Speakers
avatar for Spencer Brien

Spencer Brien

Assistant Professor, Naval Posgraduate School
JG

Joe Grengs

University of Michigan
avatar for Wen Wang

Wen Wang

Associate Professor, Rutgers University—Newark
Dr. Wen Wang's research focuses on intergovernmental fiscal relations, capital budgeting and finance, and education policy and finance. His research work has appeared in National Tax Journal, Public Budgeting and Finance, Land Use Policy, American Review of Public Administration... Read More →

Moderators
JG

Joe Grengs

University of Michigan

Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Lakeshore B (1st Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.06 Race, Residency and Education
Gentrification and School Desegregation: What Makes Advantaged White Parents Opt in?
Molly Makris, Guttman Community College, City University of New York

School Choice and Urban Residency: The Impact of Expanded Choice on Camden Housing Decisions
Keith Benson, Rutgers University - Graduate School of Education; Camden City School District (NJ)

Bilingual Education as a Choice: Gentrification, School Choice and Second Language Acquisition
Mirna Lascano, NCIS; Gordana Rabrenovic, Northeastern University

Speakers
MM

Molly Makris

Guttman Community College, City University of New York
avatar for Keith Benson, Rutgers University

Keith Benson, Rutgers University

President, Camden Education Association

Moderators
avatar for Kirk E. Harris, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Kirk E. Harris, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Dr. Kirk E.  Harris is the first full-time tenured African-American faculty member in the Department of Urban Planning, in the School of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. Dr. Harris' academic interests are focused on racial and economic... Read More →

Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Greenway Ballroom-H (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.07 Locational Decision Making in Local Planning
Informed Industry Targeting: Grow Clusters for Learning Industries at Optimal Sizes
Li Fang, University of Maryland, College Park

Attracting Private Capital to Revitalize Distressed Communities: Case Studies from North Carolina
Mai Nguyen, UNC-Chapel Hill; Tyler Mulligan, UNC-Chapel Hill

Economic Clustering in Australia’s Resource Cities
Thomas Sigler, The University of Queensland; Glen Searle, The University of Queensland; Kirsten Martinus, University of Western Australia

Speakers
avatar for Mai Nguyen

Mai Nguyen

Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
avatar for Thomas Sigler, The University of Queensland

Thomas Sigler, The University of Queensland

Lecturer in Human Geography, The University of Queensland
I am a broadly trained Human Geographer with interests in urban, economic, and political geographies, as well as cultural landscapes. I'm American, but work in Australia, and have done research in Latin America and Africa, so my regional interests are quite diverse. At the moment... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Thomas Sigler, The University of Queensland

Thomas Sigler, The University of Queensland

Lecturer in Human Geography, The University of Queensland
I am a broadly trained Human Geographer with interests in urban, economic, and political geographies, as well as cultural landscapes. I'm American, but work in Australia, and have done research in Latin America and Africa, so my regional interests are quite diverse. At the moment... Read More →

Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Lakeshore A (1st Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.08 Bottom-up Sustainability and Activism
Expertise and Ignorance: Opposition to Shale Gas Development Decisions
Yasminah Beebeejaun, University College London

New Evidence on Ethnicity-Based Environmental Inequity in Southern California
Yushim Kim, Arizona State University; Yongwan Chun, University of Texas Dallas; Heather Campbell, Claremont Graduate University

Non-Profit Environmental Justice Advocacy and Sustainable Community Development in Latino America
Mariela Fernandez, Clemson University; Armando Xavier Mejia, California State University, Long Beach

Community Perceptions of Changes in Flood Risk Management Strategies: The Case of a Densely Urbanized Watershed in San Juan, Puerto Rico
Luis Santiago, University of Puerto Rico; David Flores, US Forest Service; Maria Castello, University of Puerto Rico

Speakers
YB

Yasminah Beebeejaun

Associate Professor, University College London
avatar for Luis Santiago

Luis Santiago

Professor, University of Puerto Rico
I am interested in ecosystem services and their applicability to urban and regional planning processes.

Moderators
YB

Yasminah Beebeejaun

Associate Professor, University College London

Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Greenway Ballroom-G (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.09 Governing Urban Crises and Austerity: Lessons from a Cross-National Study
Social actors in cities collaborate and struggle over the governance of spatio-temporally differentiated manifestations of the international crisis of welfarism since the late 1960s. It discusses research conducted in the cities of Dublin, Leicester, Montreal, Athens, and Barcelona as part of a larger eight-case study that also includes Baltimore, Melbourne, and Nantes. The five papers will be presented by Dr. Niamh Gaynor (Dublin), Professor Jonathan Davies (Leicester), Professor Pierre Hamel (Montreal), Professor Ioannis Chorianopoulos (Athens), and Professor Ismael Blanco (Barcelona).

Political reform from the outside in?: Governing Austerity in Dublin
Niamh Gaynor, Dublin City University

Navigating Crises and Austerity in Leicester: The Local State as an Agent of Urban Power
Jonathan Davies, De Montfort University

When Collaborative Governance Has Been Put on Hold: Exploring the Negatives Impacts of Austerity Measures for Social Actors in Montreal
Pierre Hamel, University of Montreal; Roger Keil, York University

Austerity Governance and the Changing Matrices of Urban Politics in Athens-Greece
Ioannis Chorianopoulos, University of the Aegean Collaborative 

Governance Under a Radical Left Government. The Case of Barcelona
 
Ismael Blanco, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona; Iolanda Bianchi, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona - Università IUAV di Venezia; Yuni Salazar, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 

Speakers
avatar for Ismael Blanco, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Ismael Blanco, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

University Autònoma de Barcelona
avatar for Jonathan Davies

Jonathan Davies

Director - Centre for Urban Research on Austerity, De Montfort University
I am Director of the Centre for Urban Research on Austerity at De Montfort University in Leicester, UK. See http://cura.our.dmu.ac.uk for further information about the Centre. I am a political sociologist, studying urban governance from a Gramscian point of view.I am about to enter... Read More →
avatar for Pierre Hamel

Pierre Hamel

Professor, Université de Montréal

Moderators
avatar for Jonathan Davies

Jonathan Davies

Director - Centre for Urban Research on Austerity, De Montfort University
I am Director of the Centre for Urban Research on Austerity at De Montfort University in Leicester, UK. See http://cura.our.dmu.ac.uk for further information about the Centre. I am a political sociologist, studying urban governance from a Gramscian point of view.I am about to enter... Read More →

Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-1 (1st Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.10 Rethinking Government Structures and Service Provision
Regional Governance and Transit Service: Agency Tradition versus Public Mobility?
Daniel Bliss, Illinois Institute of Technology

Functional Scope of Cities in US Metropolitan Areas
Agustin Leon-Moreta, University of New Mexico

Modes of Governance: The Social-Ecological System of Urban Lakes in Bangalore
Sanchayan Nath, Indiana University Bloomington

Understanding Satisfaction Levels of Wisconsin Municipal Judges Toward Their Jobs on the Bench
Scott R. Letteney, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee; Douglas M. Ihrke, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee


Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-2 (1st Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.12 Activist Scholarship Special Session: Civic Engagement, Institutional Relations, Resource Delivery & Education
Papers in this panel investigated the intersections of civic engagement and institutions, including educational institutions, with social capital and city services related to housing. The panel investigates these intersections from local neighborhoods in the US and abroad.

Regional Planning, Access to Opportunity, and Freddie Gray: Lessons from Baltimore
Nick Finio, University of Maryland, College Park; Gerrit Knaap, National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education; Casey Dawkins, University of Maryland, College Park; Willow Lung-Amam, University of Maryland, College Park; Eli Knaap, University of Maryland, College Park; Brandon Bedford, National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education

Application of Housing Policies and Programs as a Means of Providing Justice and Harmony in Nigerian Cities
Sabina Chiaka Osuji, Imo State University, Owerri, Nigeria

Educational Choice and Social Capital In Struggling Communities
Rebecca Frances Kemper, Ohio State University

Activist Scholars / Marginal Gentrifiers: Exploring a Praxis of Boundary Crossing
Catherine Guimond, San Francisco Art Institute

Grassroots Parental Organizing Can Bridge Economic, Racial and Geographic Divides: The Case of Save Our Schools NJ
Julia Sass Rubin, Rutgers University

Speakers
CG

Catherine Guimond

University of California, Berkeley
avatar for Sabina Chiaka Osuji, Imo University Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria

Sabina Chiaka Osuji, Imo University Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria

Lecturer, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Imo State University Owerri
I AM A LECTURER ALSO A PhD CANDIDATE UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA, NSUKKA, ENUGU CAMPUS, ENUGU, NIGERIA ABOUT URBAN PLANNING AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
avatar for Julia Sass Rubin, Rutgers

Julia Sass Rubin, Rutgers

Associate Professor, Rutgers
Julia Sass Rubin, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University and an Associate Visiting Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. She also is one of the founding members of Save Our Schools... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Frances Kemper, Ohio State University

Rebecca Frances Kemper, Ohio State University

Ph.D. Candidate & Managing Editor, Ohio State University
Rebecca Kemper's research is concerned with institutional and neighbor social networks within urban neighborhoods deemed as economically distressed. She is the founder of Equitable Urban Futures, a Columbus, Ohio social justice think-tank and is a contributor to the Columbus African... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Rebecca Frances Kemper, Ohio State University

Rebecca Frances Kemper, Ohio State University

Ph.D. Candidate & Managing Editor, Ohio State University
Rebecca Kemper's research is concerned with institutional and neighbor social networks within urban neighborhoods deemed as economically distressed. She is the founder of Equitable Urban Futures, a Columbus, Ohio social justice think-tank and is a contributor to the Columbus African... Read More →

Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Greenway Ballroom-F (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.13 Activist Scholarship Special Session: Mass Incarceration; Public Housing Policy; and Neoliberalism
Papers in this panel illuminate aspects of mass incarceration - the exclusion of the formerly incarcerated from public housing; the neoliberal criminalization of poverty as a strategy to cleanse the city of low-income Black residents in order to mobilize city space for profit generation, as well as efforts to oppose or prevent it - the linking of local activists to change statewide policies on incarceration; and an "I Am My Brothers Keeper" program in one community.

I Am My Brothers Keeper: Building Assets to Expand Opportunity, Build Community and Stop Violence facing African-American
Jason Reece, Ohio State University; Joshua Bates, Ohio State University; Zach Kenitzer, Ohio State University

Black Lives Do Matter: Racial Justice, Religious Activism and the Fight for Freedom and Survival in Urban Space
Michael R Fisher, Vanderbilt University

Taking it to the Next Level: Linking Urban Communities to Influence State Criminal Justice Policy
Richard Allen Hays, University of Northern Iowa

Speakers
Moderators
avatar for Celetta Williams-Hunter, Holy Names University

Celetta Williams-Hunter, Holy Names University

Graduate Student - Urban Education/Educator, Holy Names University/ Castlemont High School
An urban educator and proud Oakland native, Celetta Williams-Hunter is currently teaching 10th Grade English at her alma mater, Castlemont High School in her East Bay community. Having previously earned a bachelors in Human Development, she has also returned to education as a student... Read More →

Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Greenway Ballroom-J (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.14 The Enduring Significance of Race in Urban Policy
Race is frequently framed as a background factor, added complication, or parallel process in the urban policy literature –if it is mentioned at all. Housing foreclosures may affect Latinos in Phoenix more often, or poverty in Chicago may affect African American youth more frequently, for example, but the causal role of racism and racialization is often downplayed. These are class problems, so the tendency goes; race is a mere variable (if it is invoked at all). This panel features an eclectic set of papers that foreground the role of race in the construction, analysis, and resolution of urban problems. The topics of the session are varied—from ethno-racial multi-generational household differences, to African American tenant activism in Atlanta, to the role of race in the production of land abandonment in Rust Belt cities. Theoretical perspectives are similarly varied, ranging from group threat approaches, to critical race theory, to urban political economy. The common thread is the centering and theorizing of race in the study of urban policy, with the goal of creating more inclusive and critical urban theories and analyses.

Race and the Production of Extreme Land Abandonment in the American Rust Belt
Jason Hackworth, Case Western Reserve University

The Role of Race and Ethnicity in Seniors’ Economic Outcomes in Multigenerational Households
Deirdre Pfeiffer, Arizona State Unviversity

Comparing Black Tenant Activism In and Out of Atlanta's Public Housing Developments 
Akira Rodriguez, Unviersity of Pennsylvania School of Design


Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Greenway Ballroom-I (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.15 : (P)olitics & politics: Challenges and Limits of Organizing Low-wage Immigrants in Contemporary Labor Movements
In this panel session, we consider some of the challenges and limitations of contemporary immigrant and labor organizing efforts, particularly the nonprofit worker center model. Worker centers represent a relatively new organizational model that has gained much traction and support among activists, labor advocates, and academics for their ability to politicize and organize low-wage immigrant workers, a population that has historically been deemed “unorganizable” by traditional labor unions. Despite their relatively recent emergence, they are seen as the most successful policy intervention in their ability to enforce labor laws and establish wage floors, as well as “incorporating” immigrant and displaced workers into American community life. Yet few studies have actually examined the day-to-day operations of these organizations, their organizational structure, or funding sources; even fewer have examined the political limitations of the nonprofit worker center model more broadly. As labor unions and worker centers continue to struggle to engage low-wage immigrant workers, we illustrate new ways of thinking about immigrant labor organizing that can be conducive to building a sustainable mass movement.

“Our Lives, Our Stories”?: Testimonial Theatre and Storytelling in Contemporary Domestic Worker Organizing in the U.S.
Erika Grajeda, The Graduate Center, City University of New York

The Resentful Foreigner: Racialization of Chinese Workers in Asian Fusion Restaurants
Tommy Wu, The Graduate Center, City University of New York


Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-3 (1st Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.16 Urban Revitalization, Economic Development and Consequences
Static Neighborhood Hierarchies or a Great Inversion?: New Evidence and Implications for Public Policy
Anthony Damiano, University of Minnesota; Edward Goetz, University of Minnesota

It’s the Economic Development, Stupid! Assessing the Rising Socio-economic Inequalities in Urban Switzerland by Analysing Local Policy Narratives
Lineo Devecchi, University of Zurich

Green Cities, Multimodal Cities, “Just” Cities?: Income Inequality and the Promise of Sustainable Transportation
Chad Frederick, University of Louisville; John Gilderbloom, University of Louisville



Speakers
avatar for Chad Frederick

Chad Frederick

Sr. Research Associate, Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods
Multimodal Cities. Sustainability Ontology. Critical Pragmatism.
avatar for Anthony Damiano, University of Minnesota

Anthony Damiano, University of Minnesota

PhD Candidate/Research Assistant, University of Minnesota
PhD candidate at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota. Research assistant at the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA) . Research interests include housing policy, urban political economy, race and inequality. Quantitative analysis using R, Stata... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Thomas Vicino, Northeastern University

Thomas Vicino, Northeastern University

Associate Professor, Northeastern University
Professor Vicino specializes in the political economy of cities and suburbs, focusing on issues of metropolitan development, housing, and demographic analysis.

Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Lakeshore C (1st Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.17 Enduring Urban Injustice: How the State of Nevada Deals Las Vegas a Losing Hand
This panel will discuss the social, political and economic relationship between the state of Nevada and Las Vegas, its largest metropolitan area. The research shows that one of the nation’s most diverse metropolitan areas is being systematically shortchanged by a rural-focused state capitol in Carson City. Given that Las Vegas is now a majority-minority metropolis, and the rest of the State is mostly white, this creates one of the most significant State-level social inequity racial dynamics in America. A team of researchers at UNLV are organized to identify, catalog, and ultimately offer solutions to ameliorate long standing discriminatory actions by the Nevada state government. In particular, the panelists reveal issues of race, space, political economy and governance. Panelists will offer creative ways to rectify resource inequality in Las Vegas via political action that coalesces regional interests and prioritizes legislative mandates for change.

The Political Economy of Nevada’s Geography
David Damore, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Growing Pains and Capitol Gains: The Impact of Population Growth on Local Governance in Southern Nevada

Karen Danielsen, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Education Governance and Urban Representation in Nevada: Challenges and Solutions

Magdalena Martinez, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Caitlin Saladino, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Favoring the North: How Nevada Emphasized Economic Development Efforts in Reno Over Las Vegas
Robert Lang, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Speakers
RL

Robert Lang

UNLV/Brookings Mountain West
MM

Magdalena Martinez, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Dr. Magdalena Martinez is an assistant professor in the department of Public Policy and Leadership, College of Urban Affairs, and Director of Education Programs with The Lincy Institute. Her areas of expertise include education policy, leadership, access and equity for underrepresented... Read More →

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 10:50am - 12:15pm
Greenway Ballroom-E (2nd Floor)

12:15pm

1:19pm

1:20pm

TH1.20.00 HOPE VI Outcomes: Prioritizing Residents?
Built Environment Characteristics and Residential Satisfaction among Relocated Public Housing Residents and their Post-Relocation Neighbors
Renée A. Skeete, Georgia State University

HOPE VI, Boston Style:  Prioritizing Public Housing Residents While Reinvesting in the Neighborhood
Lawrence Vale, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

HUD’s Last HOPE VI Funded Program:  Better or Worse?
John Gilderbloom, University of Louisville; Wesley Meares, Augusta University

Speakers
Moderators
avatar for Jonathan Davies

Jonathan Davies

Director - Centre for Urban Research on Austerity, De Montfort University
I am Director of the Centre for Urban Research on Austerity at De Montfort University in Leicester, UK. See http://cura.our.dmu.ac.uk for further information about the Centre. I am a political sociologist, studying urban governance from a Gramscian point of view.I am about to enter... Read More →

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Greenway Ballroom-A (2nd Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.02 Affordable Housing & Housing Choice Vouchers Embedded in Communities
Can Housing Choice Vouchers Be Used to Achieve “Smart” Gentrification: A Cincinnati Case Study
David Varady, University of Cincinnati; Ryan Dyson, University of Cincinnati; Xinhao Wang, University of Cincinnati

From Racial Resentment to Racial Rejection: How Local Residents Veto Voucher Movement to their Neighborhoods 
Rahim Kurwa, University of California, Los Angeles

Measuring Homeowners’ Attitudes Towards Affordable Housing: How Housing Design can Alleviate Affordable Housing Stigma 
Cody Price, Ohio State University

Market Rate Conversion of Section 8 HUD Housing: Understanding Residents’ Perspectives on Information Dissemination in Preparing for Relocation
Tam E. Perry, Wayne State University; Justin Petrusak, Wayne State University

Housing Choice Vouchers and Low-Income Households in St Cloud, MN
Deborah Mitchell, University of Minnesota; Marilyn Bruin, University of Minnesota

Speakers
DP

David P. Varady, University of Cincinnati

University of Cincinnati
University of Cincinnati
DM

Deborah Mitchell

University of Minnesota
avatar for Cody Price

Cody Price

The Ohio State University

Moderators
DP

David P. Varady, University of Cincinnati

University of Cincinnati
University of Cincinnati

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Greenway Ballroom-B (2nd Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.03 Addressing Needs in Shrinking Legacy Cities
Rental Housing Quality in Legacy Cities: What Do We Know and What Can Be Done?
Megan Hatch, Cleveland State University

Sprucing Up the Storefront: A Qualitative Comparison of Business District Placemaking Strategies in the Rustbelt
Amanda Ashley, Boise State University; Stephanie Ryberg-Webster, Cleveland State University

Location Affordability in U.S. Shrinking Cities: Results from a Cleveland
Survey J. Rosie Tighe, Cleveland State University; Joanna Ganning, Cleveland State University

How Neoliberal Metropolitan-City Building Underdevelops Black Neighborhoods: The Case of Buffalo, New York
Henry Taylor, University at Buffalo; Camden Miller, University at Buffalo

Urban Regeneration in U.S. Shrinking Cities: Affordable Housing Issues in Detroit 
Julie Mah, University of Toronto

Speakers
avatar for Megan Hatch

Megan Hatch

Cleveland State University
avatar for J. Rosie Tighe

J. Rosie Tighe

Associate Professor, Cleveland State University

Moderators
avatar for J. Rosie Tighe

J. Rosie Tighe

Associate Professor, Cleveland State University

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Greenway Ballroom-C (2nd Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.06 Urban Green Spaces
Park Futures: Excavating Images of Tomorrow’s Urban Green Spaces
Anna Barker, University of Leeds; Adam Crawford, University of Leeds; Booth Nathan, University of Leeds; David Churchill, University of Leeds

Urban Community Gardens and the Commodification of Space: Community Gardening and Neighborhood Change in St. Louis, MO
Taylor Braswell, Saint Louis University

Revisiting Political Economy of Greenbelt for Sustainable Urban Growth Management - A Cross-Country Case Study
Albert Tonghoon Han, University of Calgary; Min Hee Go, Brooklyn College, City University of New York

The Development and Distribution of Urban Green Spaces: A Case Study of Phoenix, Arizona
Joanna Lucio, Arizona State University; Elizabeth Corley, Arizona State University; Yushim Kim, Arizona State University; Anna Kellogg, Arizona State University

Speakers
avatar for Taylor Harris Braswell

Taylor Harris Braswell

Saint Louis University
Taylor is an MA Sociology student at Saint Louis University and will begin PhD work at Northeastern University in the Fall. His research interests include spatial methods, political ecology, political economy, and the tension between urbanization and environmental degradation.

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Greenway Ballroom-G (2nd Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.07 Progressive Measures: How Well Are they Doing at the Local Level?
A Study of Funding Allocations Among Chicago's MSA Entitlement Communities
Al Gourrier, Unviversity of Baltimore

Homeowner Association and Local Government Revenue Structure
Shaoming Cheng, Florida International University

The Effects of the Texas School Property Tax Abatement Program on Public School Finance
Megan Randall, Urban Institute

Is Obamacare Turning Hospitals into CDCs?: Evaluating the Affordable Care Act’s Impact on Anchor Institution Practice
Stephen Sherman, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Marc Doussard, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Speakers
avatar for Al Gourrier, University of Baltimore

Al Gourrier, University of Baltimore

Assistant Professor, University of Baltimore
avatar for Megan Randall

Megan Randall

Research Associate II, Urban Institute
I am a research associate in the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center at the Urban Institute, where I work on projects pertaining to state and local finance. Before joining Urban, I conducted research on social policy in Texas, including on state health care, housing, and tax policy... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Sherman

Stephen Sherman

PhD candidate, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
PhD candidate in Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.Research focus: policing and urban planning, anchor institutions, economic development, qualitative GISOther interests: higher education in prison, anthropology of policing, the American... Read More →
HD

Hai David Guo, Florida International University

Florida International University

Moderators
avatar for Al Gourrier, University of Baltimore

Al Gourrier, University of Baltimore

Assistant Professor, University of Baltimore

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-3 (1st Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.08 Towards Environmental Justice: Sustainability and Social Justice Put Together
Balancing Social Justice and Environmental Sustainability in the U.S.-Mexico Transborder Region
Sylvia Gonzalez-Gorman, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

A Socio-economic Exploration into Environmental Burdens
Zeenat Kotval-K, Michigan State University; Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University

Urban Greening and Environmental Justice: Policies and Possibilities
Scott Krummenacher, Washington University in St. Louis



Speakers
SG

Sylvia Gonzalez-Gorman

Assistant Professor, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
avatar for Zeenat Kotval-K

Zeenat Kotval-K

Michigan State University
SK

Scott Krummenacher

Washington University in St. Louis

Moderators
IV

Igor Vojnovic

Michigan State University

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Greenway Ballroom-I (2nd Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.09 Theorizing Urban Political Change: Perspectives from American Political Development
The papers on this panel focus on the phenomenon of urban political change, approaching this issue from an American political development (APD) perspective. Some have suggested that APD represents a promising approach with which to rekindle interest in questions of urban political power and governance, once-prominent themes in the urban politics field that have received less attention in recent years. This panel presents several examples of how the APD approach might serve this function.

Charting Change in the City: Urban Political Orders and Urban Political Development
Timothy Weaver, University at Albany-SUNY

Urban Political Authority in Canada: Tracing the Political Development of the Western Canadian City
Jack Lucas, University of Calgary

Looking Backwards; Rebuilding Explanations
Heywood Sanders, University of Texas at San Antonio

How Policy Paradigms Change: Lessons from Chicago’s Urban Renewal Program
Joel Rast, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Speakers
JR

Joel Rast, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
avatar for Timothy Weaver

Timothy Weaver

University at Albany (SUNY)
Author of Blazing the Neoliberal Trail: Urban Political Development in the United States and the United Kingdom (Penn Press, 2016).

Moderators
JR

Joel Rast, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-2 (1st Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.10 Governing Amidst Uncertainty
Usage of Specialized Service Delivery
Christopher Goodman, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Demographic Change Creates Predictable Government Organizational Chaos
David Hamilton, Hamline University; Carol Becker, Hamline University

Interlocal Cooperation Amidst Uncertainty: How Variation in Institutional Setting Affects the Reasoning of Local Public Actors
Thomas Skuzinski, Virginia Tech

Metropolitan Governance, Decentralization Policy and Economic Development
 Doddy Iskandar, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Speakers
Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-1 (1st Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.11 Housing and Community Development in Asia
Yes, Some Can: Exploring CBO Effectiveness in Community-driven Upgrading in Indonesia
Ashok Das, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Hawaii at Mānoa

Building New Migrant Community Based on Old Industrial Base 
Ge Dandong, Zhejiang University; Fang Mengyi, Zhejiang University; Xu Wei, Zhejiang University

Governing the Informal: Housing Policies over Informal Settlements in China, India, and Brazil
Xuefei Ren, Michigan State University

The Right to Remain in the City: How One Community Has Used Legal Rights and Rights Talk to Stay Put in Bangkok
Hayden Shelby, University of California, Berkeley

Speakers
HS

Hayden Shelby, University of California, Berkeley

University of California, Berkeley
AD

Ashok Das, University of Hawaii at Manoa

University of Hawaii at Mānoa
XR

Xuefei Ren

Michigan State University

Moderators
AD

Ashok Das, University of Hawaii at Manoa

University of Hawaii at Mānoa

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Greenway Ballroom-D (2nd Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.12 Student Transportation and Educational Equity
This panel will discuss the potential impact of student transportation policy on school choice and student outcomes. The panelists will present an overview of transportation policy in five choice-rich cities, and provide a special focus on the effects of student transportation in New York City and Denver. The panel will explore the possibility that context-specific policy lessons can be applied more broadly across cities.

Describing and Understanding Student Transportation in Choice-Rich Cities
Matthew M. Chingos, Urban Institute; Kristin Blagg, Urban Institute

The Long Road to School: Distance, School Buses and Academic Achievement
Amy Ellen Schwartz, Syracuse University; Sarah A. Cordes, Temple University

Can Public Transportation Improve Students’ Access to Schools of Choice?
Betheny Gross, University of Washington; Patrick Denice, Washington University in St. Louis

Speakers
KB

Kristin Blagg

Research Associate, Urban Institute
avatar for Sarah A. Cordes

Sarah A. Cordes

Assistant Professor, Temple University

Moderators
KB

Kristin Blagg

Research Associate, Urban Institute

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Greenway Ballroom-H (2nd Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.13 Activist Scholarship Special Session: Grassroots Struggles for Employment and Agency in Urban Rehabilitation

Successful campaigns on issues of race, gentrification, and equity are explored in this panel.

Organizers described in the first paper simply reject the common excuses made for African-American unemployment and find success demanding that the proportions of African-Americans employed in various industries resemble the numbers of Black folk present in the population. Other themes include how histories of racial and economic segregation have exacerbated negative life outcomes in neighborhoods, both urban and rural, and why these histories are important to note before considering policy change. 

Significant Victories in the Struggle for African-American Employment in Education and Construction
Kitty Kelly Epstein, Holy Names University and Fielding Graduate University

A ’Third Reconstruction’ for the Third Sector’s "Right to Work” on Rights-of- Way
Fallon Samuels Aidoo, Harvard University 

Parque Minhocão, São Paulo – Brazil: A Case Study on Urban Rehabilitation, Placemaking and Gentrification 
Deboro Sotto, Grupo de Pesquisa Meio Ambiente Urbano São Paulo - Brazil

Beautiful Walls: Mural Making and Precarity in the City 
Bethany Welch, Aquinas Center

Speakers
FS

Fallon Samuels Aidoo

Harvard University
avatar for Bethany Welch, Aquinas Center

Bethany Welch, Aquinas Center

Executive Director, Aquinas Center
Bethany J. Welch, Ph.D. is the founding director of Aquinas Center. Her research on the Catholic Church and urban revitalization prompted Philadelphia’s St. Thomas Aquinas parish to invite her to help them repurpose a former convent to create a space that builds unity in diversity... Read More →
avatar for Kitty Kelly Epstein

Kitty Kelly Epstein

Professor, Holy Names University and Fielding Graduate University
In 2013 Kitty Kelly Epstein was honored with the Activist Scholar Award at the national conference of the Urban Affairs Association.  This was based on her work in Oakland, California where she led an innovation in democracy that consisted of 41 groups comprised of 800 people whose... Read More →

Moderators
LS

Louise Simmons, University of Connecticut

Professor of Social Work & Director, UConn Urban Semester Program, University of Connecticut
Social and economic justice

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Greenway Ballroom-J (2nd Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.14 Local Context and the Politics of Immigrant Integration and Exclusion
Immigrant integration has long been a salient issue for urban communities and local government officials. But how does the local demographic, civic, and political context affect immigrant integration? This panel combines studies that investigate how different city contexts in the United States and Europe affect immigrants’ civic and political integration. They ask: What explains the different level and degree of political incorporation of similar refugee communities in two new immigrant destinations in the American Midwest? What local contextual factors explain the framing, passage, and defeat of campaigns to restore immigrant voting rights in several U.S. cities? How does local context influence the institutional development, policy outputs, and community-building capacities of the growing number of city immigrant affairs offices in the United States? And in response to global crises, how have local policymakers in two different European cities responded to promote and hinder immigrant integration initiatives? The papers in this panel address these important questions using original quantitative and qualitative data and drawing on a range of literatures and theoretical perspectives.

Somalis in the Twin Cities and Columbus: Political Incorporation in New Immigrant Destinations
Stefanie Chambers, Trinity College

Immigrant Voting: Vehicle for Immigrant Integration in Cities?
Ron Hayduk, San Francisco State University; Kathleen Coll, San Francisco State University

City Immigrant Affairs Offices: The Role of Local Context
Els de Graauw, Baruch College, City University of New York 

Crisis Narrative and the Shrinking Domain of Migrant Rights to the City: The Cases of London and Dublin
Jill S. Gross, Hunter College, City University of New York 

The Role Cities Can Play in Facilitating Immigrant Inclusion:  NYC-A Case in Point
Nisha Agarwal, Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs; Vicky Virgin, NYC Center for Economic Opportunity

Speakers
avatar for Stefanie Chambers, Trinity College - Hartford

Stefanie Chambers, Trinity College - Hartford

Professor & Chair - Dept. of Political Science, Trinity College
VV

Vicky Virgin

Research Associate, NYC Mayor's Office

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Lakeshore C (1st Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.15 Equity Effects of New Labor Market Policies
Anticipated Impact, Actual Effects: Understanding Employer Responses Over Time to Local Minimum Wage Laws
Scott Allard, University of Washington; Jennifer Romich, University of Washington; Anne Althauser, University of Washington; James Buszkiewicz, University of Washington; Emmi Obara, University of Washington

A Fair Chance at Work: Employment Chances for African Americans under “Ban the Box” Laws
Amanda Martin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Understanding the Differentiated Impact of Virginia's VIEW Program for Multiple Populations: Which Program Components Matter Most?
Elsie Harper-Anderson, Virginia Commonwealth University; Wendy Carter-Veale, University of Maryland Baltimore County

The Economic and Social Welfare Impact of Wage Theft: Implications for Theory and Practice
Jacob Lesniewski, Dominican University; Joshua Drucker, University of Illinois Chicago; Jessica Darrow, University of Chicago

Speakers
avatar for Jacob Lesniewski

Jacob Lesniewski

Assistant Professor, Dominican University
I teach social policy to social workers. I think a lot about how low-wage workers (and low-wage immigrant workers especially) can improve their working conditions. I spend a lot of time working with worker centers in Chicago. I'm starting to think about privatization and its effects... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Martin

Amanda Martin

PhD Student, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
EH

Elsie Harper-Anderson, Virginia Commonwealth University

Assistant Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University

Moderators
EN

Elizabeth Nisbet, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York

John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Lakeshore B (1st Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.16 Can Policy Conquer Urban Inequality?
Purchasing Progressive Policy – Buying the Dallas Citydesign Studio
Wayne Beggs, Simon Fraser University

Creating Digital Opportunity? Inclusive Innovation in the ‘Ordinary’ City
Allison Bramwell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

The Economic Integration Agenda
Paul Jargowsky, Rutgers University - Camden

Fiscal Policy Driven Urban Renewal: To Whose Benefit? At Whose Cost?
Natalie Prochaska, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign; Andrew Greenlee, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

In Spite of Injustice: Cooperating for Regional Success
Alex Wesaw, Ohio State University

Speakers
avatar for Wayne Beggs

Wayne Beggs

Instructor, Indigenous Community Planning, University of British Columbia, School of Community and Regional Planning
AB

Allison Bramwell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

University of North Carolina at Greensboro
avatar for Paul A. Jargowsky

Paul A. Jargowsky

Director, Center for Urban Research and Education, Rutgers University - Camden
avatar for Natalie Prochaska, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Natalie Prochaska, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Research Assistant, PhD Student, The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Affordable housing and commercial real estate development, Municipal land use finance, Debt securitization, Community land trusts, Community development finance
avatar for Alex Wesaw

Alex Wesaw

PhD Candidate, Teaching Associate, The Ohio State University
I am a PhD Candidate at The Ohio State University. I am interested in community economic development within regions. Particularly, I am interested in the relationships between American Indian tribal governments and their non-tribal government neighbors. My own tribe is the Pokagon... Read More →

Moderators
AB

Allison Bramwell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Greenway Ballroom-E (2nd Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.17 Urban Challenges: Spatial, Social, and Racial Dynamics
Informal Housing and Informed Neglect: The Management of Illegal Dwellings Issue in New York
Ryan Devlin, John Jay College, City University of New York

The Micro-Spaces of Urban Inequality: Mapping Race, Class, Gender, and Violence in the City of God
Anjuli Fahlberg, Northeastern University

Homeownership in Distressed Neighborhoods: Purchasing Property within the Modern-Day Redline
Christine Jang, Johns Hopkins University

Transformation of Center Cities Neighborhood in Montreal: The Case Study of HoMa 
Sylvie Paré, Université du Québec à Montréal 

Speakers
RD

Ryan Devlin

John Jay College (CUNY)
avatar for Anjuli Fahlberg

Anjuli Fahlberg

Northeastern University
My research looks at questions of governance, citizenship, and violence in urbanizing Latin America through various methodologies, including fieldwork, research on social media platforms, and community surveys. My dissertation examined the possibilities for social and political action... Read More →
avatar for Christine Jang

Christine Jang

Ph.D Student, Johns Hopkins University
avatar for Sylvie Paré

Sylvie Paré

Professeure titulaire, University of Quebec in Montreal
Je m'intéresse aux questions de genre, d'ethnicité et de classes sociales dans la ville, à Montréal ou à Toronto. Pour le moment, mes travaux portent essentiellement sur les femmes immigrantes entrepreneures de Montréal, le genre et territoire et la transition du quartier de... Read More →

Moderators
RD

Ryan Devlin

John Jay College (CUNY)

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Greenway Ballroom-F (2nd Floor)

1:20pm

TH1.20.18 Metromobility and Spatial Justice I: Thick Mobile Inequalities
This panel focuses on spatial justice issues related to bus- and rail-based urban transit. It looks to regimes of metromobility in order to understand how metropolitan transit spaces are produced, by and for whom, and to what effect. Panelists consider the relationships between metromobility and (in)justice in different empirical contexts and through a variety of epistemological postures and theoretical lenses. On the one hand, they trace how transit systems are imbricated in complex relations of urban inequality and oppression. On the other hand, they also explore how transit systems may be planned, managed, and used in emancipatory ways. In so doing, panelists make important contributions to debates about mobility justice and the right to the city.

Transitscapes of Diversity and Difference
Anna Kramer, University of Toronto

Differentiated Spaces: Stuck at the Crossroads of Spatial and Mobile Inequality
Gwendolyn Purifoye, Kent State University at Stark

Seeing Residential Im/mobilities in New York City
Jerome Krase, Brooklyn College, City University New York


Speakers
JK

Jerome Krase

Professor Emeritus, Brooklyn College CUNY
Emeritus and Murray Koppelman Professor at Brooklyn College of The City University of New York I am an activist-scholar regarding urban community issues. I research, lecture, write and photograph urban life and culture globally. Among my books are Self and Community in the City (1982... Read More →

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 1:20pm - 2:45pm
Lakeshore A (1st Floor)

2:45pm

2:59pm

3:00pm

TH3.00.16 Activist Scholarship Special Session:Translation and Healing Justice in the Face of Trauma in Community-Engaged Scholarship
Scholars have traditionally played roles such as those of the initiator, consultant, or collaborator in community-based research. Arguably, these roles often reify a hierarchy of knowledge, in which the scholar ultimately brings or leads production of legitimate, “official,” institutionalized knowledge to on-the-ground community concerns and campaigns. In this colloquium, we reflect upon and ask what other roles scholars might play in community-engaged research, especially that of the translator. What might research projects and collaborations that do not give the academic ultimate authorial power look like? What tensions must we grapple with in work aimed at valuing different modes of research, knowledge production, and presentation? How might scholars work to “translate” between different communities, audiences, and agendas in such work, without placing academic knowledge above local knowledge? In this Activist Scholar Special Session, we consider these questions in the face of profound trauma in the communities with whom we work, and in higher education. Amidst continued and pervasive police brutality, labor struggles, deportations, and violence against LGBTQ-identified persons, we also bear witness heightened hate speech and a retrenchment of resources in many universities.

Erika Grajeda, The Graduate Center, City University of New York
Richa Nagar, University of Minnesota
Celina Su, The Graduate Center, City University of New York


Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-J (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.02 Neighborhood Effects: Consequences of Living in Disadvantaged Neighborhoods
Chronic School Absenteeism in Public School Students: Examining the Intersection of People, Place and Parcel in Pittsburgh, PA
Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh; Feifei Ye, University of Pittsburgh

Dangerous Enough: Perceptions of Crime and Safety Among Neighborhood Residents
Sara Martucci, The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Mobility Rates in Making Connections Survey Communities, Five Years Later
Becki Curtis, University of Chicago; Catherine Haggerty, NORC at the University of Chicago; Ned English, NORC at the University of Chicago

Death and Taxes: Going Beyond Neighborhood Poverty to Estimate the Spatial Inequality in Premature Death
Anita Zuberi, Duquesne University; Samantha Teixeira, Boston College

Squatting for Survival: Informal Housing in Declining U.S. Cities
Claire W. Herbert, Drexel University

Speakers
KB

Kate Bachtell

NORC at the University of Chicago
CW

Claire W. Herbert

Assistant Professor of Sociology, Drexel University
avatar for Sara Martucci

Sara Martucci

Assistant Professor, Mercy College
gentrification, retail, housing, cultural displacement, neighborhoods
avatar for Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

University of Pittsburgh
Sabina Deitrick, PhD, is Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs and Director of Urban and Regional Analysis program at the University Center for Social and Urban Research (UCSUR) at the University of Pittsburgh.  Her research focuses on issues... Read More →
avatar for Anita Zuberi, Duquesne University

Anita Zuberi, Duquesne University

Assistant Professor, Duquesne University

Moderators
avatar for Anita Zuberi, Duquesne University

Anita Zuberi, Duquesne University

Assistant Professor, Duquesne University

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-C (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.03 Community Participation and Community Mobilization
Model CBAs and Community Benefits Ordinances as Tools for Negotiating Equitable Development: Three Critical Cases
Nicholas Belongie, University at Buffalo; Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo

Civic Park Neighborhood Economic Development in Flint
Louise Jezierski, Michigan State University; Aaron Foote, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

“Public Interest” and the Legitimacy: Engaging Residents in Housing Requisition in Shanghai
Zhumin Xu, University of Hong Kong

Transforming Citizenship: Local Permanent Registration and Political Participation in Post-Soviet Kyrgyzstan 
Ajar Chekirova, University of Illinois in Chicago and American University in Central Asia

Speakers
avatar for Nicholas Belongie, University at Buffalo

Nicholas Belongie, University at Buffalo

Doctoral Student Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Graduate Research Assistant, Center for Urban Studies, University at Buffalo, State University of New York
avatar for Louise Jezierski, Michigan State University

Louise Jezierski, Michigan State University

Michigan State University
I have been a professor at Michigan State since 1997.My MA and PhD are in Sociology from UC Berkeley, and my BA is from Boston University in Sociology and Geography.
ZX

Zhumin Xu

University of Hong Kong

Moderators
avatar for Louise Jezierski, Michigan State University

Louise Jezierski, Michigan State University

Michigan State University
I have been a professor at Michigan State since 1997.My MA and PhD are in Sociology from UC Berkeley, and my BA is from Boston University in Sociology and Geography.

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-D (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.04 Historic Preservation: Space and Place
The Magnitude of Memory: Challenges of Scale in Commemorating Slavery in Richmond, Virginia
Jason James, University of Mary Washington

Collective Memory and City Planning: The Continuing Legacy of Park Planning in Memphis, TN
Susan Roakes, University of Memphis

Declining Heritage: How the Gdańsk Shipyard, the Cradle of the Solidarity Movement, was Treated by Politics and Urban Planning in Post-1989 Poland?
Jakub Szlachetko, University of Gdansk

Speakers
Moderators
AF

Arturo Flores, Instituto Electoral del Distrito Federal

Instituto Electoral del Distrito Federal

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-E (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.05 Plans, Projects in Comparative Perspective
A Methodological Assessment of Stadia´s Urban Performance: The Case of the Stade de France
Gustavo Amaral, Georgia Institute of Technology

Building a University City: An Exploration in Connecting Economic Development to Place-Making
Ming-Chun Lee, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

The Elements of Public Space that Foster Network Development
Jennifer Sloan, University of Texas at Arlington

A Global Hive: The Disappearance of Civic Space
Maria del C. Vera, University of Nevada Las Vegas

Speakers
avatar for Gustavo Amaral

Gustavo Amaral

PhD Researcher, Georgia Institute of Technology
Stadia as a building typology has been a central object of my career in academia and practice. Currently I´m a PhD student at the Georgia Institute of Technology focused on the research of design methodologies that can be applied to stadia in order to achieve beneficial legacies... Read More →
ML

Ming-Chun Lee

University of North Carolina at Charlotte
MD

Maria Del C. Vera

University of Nevada Las Vegas

Moderators
MD

Maria Del C. Vera

University of Nevada Las Vegas

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Lakeshore A (1st Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.06 Issues in Transit Oriented Development
Zoning for Growth: The Impacts of Chicago’s Transit-Oriented Development Ordinance on Housing Supply and Land Values
Yonah Freemark, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) as an Ideal-type Boundary Object? Explaining its Pervasiveness in Global Urbanism
Olivier Roy-Baillargeon, University of Waterloo; Pierre Filion, University of Waterloo

The Role of Artifacts in Urban Transport Planning – Where have all the Cars Gone?
Lisa Hansson, Molde University College

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Hansson

Lisa Hansson

Associate Professor, Molde University College - Specialized University in Logistics

Moderators

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Lakeshore B (1st Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.07 Financing Development: Practice and Theory
Opening the Black Box: Economic Development in Suburbia
Melissa Mouritsen, College of DuPage

A Blessing in Disguise: The Effects of Tax Increment Financing on Overlapping Jurisdictions
Phuong Nguyen-Hoang, University of Iowa

People vs Place: Entrepreneurship for Neighborhood Revitalization or Job Creation
Merissa Piazza, Cleveland State University; Candi Clouse, Cleveland State University; Jinhee Yun, Cleveland State Univeristy

Revisiting Municipal Fiscal Sustainability: A Comparative Study of Detroit vs. New York City
Rongrong Wei, Virginia Tech

Speakers
MM

Melissa Mouritsen

College of DuPage
avatar for Merissa Piazza, Cleveland State University

Merissa Piazza, Cleveland State University

Research Associate, Cleveland State University

Moderators
avatar for Merissa Piazza, Cleveland State University

Merissa Piazza, Cleveland State University

Research Associate, Cleveland State University

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-1 (1st Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.08 Green Infrastructure: Building Administrative Capacity and Willingness
Are We Planning for Green Infrastructure? Evaluation of Local Comprehensive Plans in the US
Hyun Woo Kim, Texas A&M University; Jeyoung Woo, The University of Texas at Austin; Yunmi Park, Auburn University; Priya Katoch, Texas A&M University

A Tale of Two Cities: Institutions, Actors, and Public Participation in Climate Change Adaptation in New York and Baltimore
Andrea Sarzynski, University of Delaware; Benjamin Wallace, Armada, Ltd.

Vertical versus Horizontal Thinking: The Impact of Confucian Norms on Environmental Management at the Local Level in China
Jill L. Tao, Incheon National University; Jong-youl Lee, Incheon National University; Seong-jin Moon, Inha University; Bo Wang, Incheon National University

The Roots of Local Food Production in US Cities
Kathryn Wassel, Florida State University

Speakers
HW

Hyun Woo Kim

Lecturer, Texas A&M University
AS

Andrea Sarzynski

University of Delaware

Moderators
avatar for Jill Tao, Incheon National University

Jill Tao, Incheon National University

Associate Professor, Incheon National University
Mayors in East Asia, how to measure Confucian norms in local government, global bureaucrats and environmental issues.

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-G (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.09 Effective Participation Methods 1
Steering Montréal towards Citizen Engagement: The Politics of Upstream, Downstream & Mainstream Deliberations on Urban Development
Lisa Bornstein, McGill University; Nik Luka, McGill University

Democratizing Urban Development: The Impact of Community Organizations on Low-Income Housing in Washington, DC and Sao Paulo
Maureen Donaghy, Rutgers University

The Promise of E-Gov? City Hall’s Responsiveness to Neighborhood Interests
Paru Shah, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Amber Wichowsky, Marquette University

Speakers
avatar for Maureen Donaghy, Rutgers University, Camden

Maureen Donaghy, Rutgers University, Camden

Associate Professor, Rutgers University
AW

Amber Wichowsky

Associate Professor, Marquette University

Moderators
AW

Amber Wichowsky

Associate Professor, Marquette University

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-3 (1st Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.10 The Ubiquitous Regional Governing Organizations (RGOs) of America
We have been developing an institutional framework for the study of governmental cross-boundary activities in America’s metropolitan and “not so much” metropolitan regions. Building off the introduction of Regional Governing Organizations (RGOs), Governing the Metropolitan Region: America’s New Frontier (Miller and Cox, 2014), we have developed a dataset of 475 RGOs that cover 83% of the US population. Our research includes detailed data for each RGO on their vision, mission, history, staff, activities, bylaws, membership rules and governing (voting rules). In addition, GIS maps of RGOs, MSAs, and Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) have been developed for each state as well as the United States. We have been particularly focused on both the connections and disconnections of federal policy as it relates to the presence of MSAs, MPOs and Economic Development Districts (EDDs). As such, the number of research questions is quite large and our intent is to make this dataset (and maps) available (and constantly refined) to the academic community.

The Historical Development of Regional Governing Organizations (RGOs)
David Miller, University of Pittsburgh

Managing the Metropolis: Unpacking Regional Governance Organizations, Metropolitan Planning Organizations, and Metropolitan Statistical Areas
Jenn Nelles, Hunter College

The Regional Power Diffusion Index (RPDI): Within Region Dynamics
George Dougherty, University of Pittsburgh

Understanding the Governance of Regional Governing Organizations (RGOs)
Jay Rickabaugh, University of Pittsburgh

Speakers
avatar for George Dougherty

George Dougherty

Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Public & International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh
MD

Mr. David Miller, University of Pittsburgh

Professor, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh
Regional Intergovernmental Organizations (RIGOs)

Moderators
MD

Mr. David Miller, University of Pittsburgh

Professor, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh
Regional Intergovernmental Organizations (RIGOs)

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-2 (1st Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.13 Explaining and Evaluating Local Immigration Policies
Immigration control and immigrant integration have become an integral part of urban governance for a growing number of cities. This panel combines studies that explain the adoption and outcomes of local immigration policies in the United States. What can municipal governments do to improve the access of immigrants to health care? Does the ethnic composition of a community influence the creation of immigrant-related projects in community development initiatives? How can cities harness immigrant entrepreneurship to promote local economic development? What makes a municipal ID card program successful in immigrant integration? Which local policies are more likely to increase local immigrant settlement? The papers in this panel address these emerging questions from theoretical, empirical and policy perspectives.

Immigrant Related Projects and Programs in Federal Empowerment Zones: Comparing Homogenous, Bifurcated and Multiethnic Places
Richard Smith, Wayne State University

ActionHealthNYC: A New Health Access Program for Uninsured Immigrants
Rishi K. Sood, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Immigrant Entrepreneurship and Economic Development: A Local Policy Perspective
Xi Huang, Georgia State University; Cathy Y. Liu, Georgia State University

The IDNYC Evaluation: Multiple Methods to Examine Implementation of a Municipal ID Program
Tamara C. Daley, Westat; Jennifer Hamilton, Westat; Laurel Lunn, Center for Victims of Torture

Local Immigration Policy and Immigrant Settlement: A Case Study of Baltimore City
Felipe A. Filomeno, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Speakers
avatar for Tamara C. Daley

Tamara C. Daley

Senior Study Director, Westat
FA

Felipe A. Filomeno

Assistant Professor, University of Maryland Baltimore County
XH

Xi Huang

Georgia State University & Georgia Institute of Technology
avatar for Richard Smith

Richard Smith

Associate Professor, Wayne State University
I am interested in sustainable community development, poverty/inequality and migration.

Moderators
avatar for Thomas Vicino, Northeastern University

Thomas Vicino, Northeastern University

Associate Professor, Northeastern University
Professor Vicino specializes in the political economy of cities and suburbs, focusing on issues of metropolitan development, housing, and demographic analysis.

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-F (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.14 Urban Education, Innovation and Equity
More Than Mobility: Race, Place, and Regional Equity
Edward Goetz, University of Minnesota; Brittany Lewis, University of Minnesota

Racial Capitalism and Public Education in the Black Metropolis
AJ Rice, Michigan State University

Community Accountability v. Social Innovation: The Case of Women in Chicago Working to End Violence Against Women
Elizabeth L. Sweet, Temple University

The Geography of School Closure Under No Child Left Behind
Drew Westberg, Coe College

Speakers
DW

Drew Westberg, Coe College

Assistant Professor of Economics, Coe College
AR

AJ Rice

Michigan State University
EL

Elizabeth L. Sweet, Temple University

Temple University-Geography and Urban Studies

Moderators
EL

Elizabeth L. Sweet, Temple University

Temple University-Geography and Urban Studies

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-H (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.15 Tackling Inequality in Cities: International Lesson Drawing from Progressive Urban Initiatives
The evidence suggests that neoliberal approaches to economic growth perpetuate poverty and increase the gap between the rich and the poor. For example, the new documentary film, The Divide, examines the growth of inequality in the US and the UK in the last 35 years and shows how life is worse for everyone in increasingly divided societies. This international panel will examine efforts being taken by particular cities and communities to address inequality in cities. Imaginative initiatives are taking place in US and UK cities to foster the creation of more inclusive cities and these deserve to receive more attention from urban scholars. The panel will compare and contrast progressive innovations in four very different cities: Bristol, UK; Memphis, TN; Portland, OR; and Tacoma, WA. The presentations will describe and analyse these serious efforts at equity planning. The panel aims to draw attention to these promising initiatives, assess their strengths and weaknesses and attempt to draw out general lessons for urban policy and practice. By focussing on international lesson drawing the panel aims to move beyond documenting the existence of growing inequality in cities to illuminate the conversation about how to develop policies that are effective in addressing social, economic and environmental inequality in our rapidly globalising world.

Reflections on Equity Planning in Portland
Lisa K. Bates, Portland State University

Struggling with Pending Gentrification
Ali Modarres, University of Washington Tacoma

The Fight to Save Foote Homes: A Story of Advocacy Planning from the American South
Kenneth M. Reardon, University of Massachusetts Boston

Uniting Public Purpose in a City: Insights from Progressive Urban Leadership in Bristol, UK
Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England, Bristol

Speakers
avatar for Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England, Bristol

Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England, Bristol

Emeritus Professor of City Leadership, University of the West of England, Bristol
I am Emeritus Professor of City Leadership at the University of the West of England, Bristol, UK and Director of Urban Answers, a company I founded in 2007 to provide assistance to city leaders on an international basis. Just now I am working quite closely with Marvin Rees, Mayor... Read More →
AM

Ali Modarres

Director, Urban Studies, University of Washington Tacoma
avatar for Lisa K. Bates, Portland State University

Lisa K. Bates, Portland State University

Associate Professor, Portland State University

Moderators
avatar for Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England, Bristol

Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England, Bristol

Emeritus Professor of City Leadership, University of the West of England, Bristol
I am Emeritus Professor of City Leadership at the University of the West of England, Bristol, UK and Director of Urban Answers, a company I founded in 2007 to provide assistance to city leaders on an international basis. Just now I am working quite closely with Marvin Rees, Mayor... Read More →

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-I (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.17 Changing American Suburbs: Housing, Population Shifts, Inequality & Planning
Housing Reinvestment Determinants in Cleveland’s Inner Suburbs
Whitney Airgood-Obrycki, Ohio State University; Bernadette Hanlon, Ohio State University

Race, Community and Planning in a “Post-Racial” America
Keith Gibson, Rhodes College

Are Immigrants Back to the City?
Cathy Liu, Georgia State University; Xi Huang, Georgia State University; Gary Painter, University of Southern California

Vacant Land as an Opportunity? The Characteristics of Vacant Land in Low-Income Urban Neighborhoods Ryun Jun Lee, Texas A&M University; Galen Newman, Texas A&M University; Shannon Van Zandt, Texas A&M University

Speakers
avatar for Whitney Airgood-Obrycki

Whitney Airgood-Obrycki

The Ohio State University
KG

Keith Gibson

Rhodes College
avatar for Cathy Liu

Cathy Liu

Associate Professor, Georgia State University
avatar for Ryun Jung Lee, Texas A&M University

Ryun Jung Lee, Texas A&M University

PhD Student in Urban and Regional Sciences, Texas A&M

Moderators
avatar for Cathy Liu

Cathy Liu

Associate Professor, Georgia State University

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-B (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

TH3.00.18 HOPE VI Outcomes: Housing Stock and Community Impacts
Taking Stock of HOPE VI: Unit Production and Resident Services, 1992-2014
Taryn Gress, Case Western Reserve University; Seungjong Cho, Case Western Reserve University; Mark Joseph, Case Western Reserve University

‘To Protect the Core Property and Allow the City to Survive’: A Case Study of Housing Policy and Urban Development in Baltimore
Peter Rosenblatt, Loyola University Chicago

HOPE VI: Policy Trends, Economic Constraints, and the Limits of Regulation
Nicholas Kelly, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Lawrence Vale, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Speakers
avatar for Taryn Gress

Taryn Gress

Strategic Director, National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities, Case Western Reserve University
Taryn is the Program Manager of NIMC providing operational and administrative support to the organization while also contributing to research and consultation projects on mixed-income developments. Before joining NIMC, Taryn implemented engagement service projects online and in the... Read More →
PR

Peter Rosenblatt

Associate professor of sociology, Loyola University Chicago

Moderators
avatar for Mai Nguyen

Mai Nguyen

Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Thursday April 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-A (2nd Floor)

4:25pm

5:00pm

5:30pm

6:30pm

Thursday - Dinner (on your own)
For options, visit the Concierge Desk or view tourist guides.

Thursday April 20, 2017 6:30pm - 7:30pm
TBA

6:30pm

 
Friday, April 21
 

6:00am

7:00am

7:00am

Cornell University Press (Discounts on urban studies titles and more!)
Meet Sr. Editor Michael McGandy at the Cornell University Press tables and get exclusive UAA discounts on our fantastic urban studies titles. Download our PDF flyer for more information!
 
Follow Michael McGandy on Twitter @michaelmcgandy
Follow Cornell Press on Twitter @CornellPress
http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/


Friday April 21, 2017 7:00am - 6:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor)

7:00am

7:00am

7:10am

7:15am

FR7.15.01 Creating Culturally and Linguistically Sustaining 'Cafeteria Cultures'
The Boston Public School (BPS) district has a strategic priority to "implement a culturally and linguistically sustaining instructional program that serves the development of the whole child". In line with that instructional focus, the BPS Food & Nutrition Services (FNS) team seeks to encourage cafeteria cultures that are culturally and linguistically supportive from an operational perspective. We are interested in strengthening ties across Boston's communities to support diverse school meal menu options; to encourage cultural culinary exploration via the physical environment in schools and cafeterias; and to promote supportive linkages between home and school through food and nutrition programming. We envision these efforts as an opportunity to further robust relationships: between central FNS staff and our 500+ cafeteria staff; between cafeteria staff and students; among students as they learn about their peers' culinary heritage and practices; and between parents and BPS as we collaboratively engage in conversations about the role of food and nutrition in "whole child" development. Our breakfast roundtable will serve as a convening for educators, administrators, practitioners, and researchers who are interested in the intersection of operational school support and community cultural and linguistic diversity.

Speakers
JY

Jaclyn Youngblood

Mayor's Office of New Urban Mechanics, Boston
Jaclyn is a program director in the Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics. She focuses primarily on operations and systems prototypes, aiming to bring delight and a human touch to what can be overwhelming interactions with city agencies. Her work includes supporting non-instructional... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:15am

FR7.15.02 Low-Income Survivors of Domestic Violence and Coordinated Entry to Housing Services: The Challenges and Successes of Four Communities
The purpose of this roundtable is to discuss the recent implementation of a coordinated entry policy employed by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The discussion will focus specifically on the policy’s impact on low-income survivors of domestic violence seeking housing services. Challenges and successes in the planning and implementation stages of this system change will be highlighted. The discussion leader has recently completed a federally funded report documenting the experience of 4 communities engaged in the coordinated entry process.


Friday April 21, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:15am

FR7.15.03 Suburban Dream or Nightmare?: The Promise and Prospects of Recent Demographic Shifts in Metropolitan America
Once commonly thought to be the sole province of the white middle class and elites, by 2010, American suburbs were home to the majority of all racial and ethnic minorities, immigrants, and the poor. In a profound departure from central city white flight that shaped the late-twentieth century metropolis, young white professionals and aging baby boomers are now moving into urban neighborhoods at unprecedented rates, while diverse, non-white, and poor suburbs are experiencing greater population gains than either central cities or predominantly white suburbs. This breakfast roundtable seeks to engage scholars in a discussion about important questions that these demographic shifts raise for future of scholarship on the American suburbs, particularly for scholars interested in issues of metropolitan equality.

Speakers
avatar for Suzanne Lanyi Charles

Suzanne Lanyi Charles

Assistant Professor, Cornell University


Friday April 21, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:15am

FR7.15.07 Comparative Urban Research: Opportunities and Challenges
This roundtable will engage in discussions on the opportunities and challenges that exist in conducting comparative urban research. From Paris to New York, Rio to New Delhi, Shanghai to Istanbul, global cities around the world experience some similar urban trajectories that warrant systematic examination. Comparative research has the potential of generating general patterns and advancing urban theories but also face challenges as the cities vary in their geographic location, political institutions, and socioeconomic traits. We invite researchers who conduct urban research in a comparative context to exchange ideas in this field.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Liu

Cathy Liu

Associate Professor, Georgia State University
XR

Xuefei Ren

Michigan State University


Friday April 21, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:15am

FR7.15.07 Moving Scholarship Beyond Academic Audiences: How to Make Your Research Accessible to Policymakers and the Public
As universities focus more attention on public engagement, researchers need to acquire a wider range of research dissemination strategies that push their work out beyond traditional scholarly outlets. How do researchers get their work noticed by policymakers and the public? In this roundtable, accomplished academic researchers share their strategies and experiences in engaging public and policymaker audiences. 

Speakers
GS

Gregory Squires

Professor of Sociology, George Washington University
DI

Dan Immergluck, Georgia Tech

Georgia Institute of Technology


Friday April 21, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:15am

FR7.15.04 Discussing Race and Systemic Inequities in the Classroom
The purpose of this roundtable is to discuss traditional as well as current trends in urban affairs pedagogy given the racially tense climate across the U.S. This discussion seeks to bring together faculty, students, and practitioners from across the gamut of urban affairs fields (public policy, political science, sociology, social work, psychology, etc.) to share and explore strategies for engaging a diverse student body in candid race-related discussions. Various topics will be discussed, including the appropriate mixture of theory and real-world application acceptable in a classroom setting.


Friday April 21, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:15am

FR7.15.05 Getting Grants and Contracts: Advice from Senior Scholars
This roundtable will share with attendees the secrets these senior scholars have used to get grants and contracts. Bring questions to the session.

Speakers
RC

Roger Caves

San Diego State University
DP

David Perry

University of Illinois at Chicago


Friday April 21, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:15am

FR7.15.06 Getting Back to Our Roots: How to Develop and Sustain Community Engagement in Urban Affairs/Studies Academic Programs
The purpose of this Breakfast Roundtable is to discuss how students, faculty, and universities can become more engaged with the larger community/city. So how do we move from theory to practice? What are the challenges? What kinds of community engagement are most successful? And what kinds of relationships and institutional supports are critical to develop and sustain community engagement? A second goal of this roundtable will be to explore the possibility of developing a colloquy or panel session on this topic for the UAA conference in Toronto. The discussion leaders both administer and teach in an urban studies academic program, and have been connected to, in varying degrees, a variety of community engagement activities in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Speakers
avatar for Jamie Harris

Jamie Harris

Associate Director, Urban Studies Programs, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
JR

Joel Rast, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee


Friday April 21, 2017 7:15am - 8:00am
Nicollet Grand Ballroom (1st Floor)

7:59am

8:00am

FR8.00.14 Using Local Research to Inform Action (Programs and Public Policies) with and for Immigrant and Refugee Communities in the Twin Cities
We will share the results of Speaking for Ourselves, a study conducted by Wilder Research with and for immigrants and refugees in the Twin Cities, including in-depth interviews with 459 Hmong, Karen, Latino, Liberian, and Somali individuals. The goal of Speaking for Ourselves was to produce useful information for improving service access and delivery and public policies that affect immigrants and refugees in the Twin Cities. The key findings and action items from each topic area covered, including social engagement, education, employment, personal finances, health, housing, transportation, safety, and discrimination will be presented. Then, presenters from tpt (Twin Cities Public Television) will discuss how cultural and language differences impact immigrant communities’ needs and preferences for public television and related programming, and how various research efforts such as Speaking for Ourselves have informed their efforts. Finally, a presenter from Hennepin County Public Health will share population-level health data from their recent SHAPE survey and will describe how they use Speaking for Ourselves to provide more information about the health status and concerns of immigrants and refugees in Hennepin County.

Anna Bartholomay, Wilder Research
Lillian McDonald, Twin Cities Public Televison 
Kaolee Vang, Twin Cities Public Television
Dave Johnson, Hennepin County Public Health

Speakers
avatar for Anna Bartholomay

Anna Bartholomay

Research Associate, Wilder Research
As a Research Associate at Wilder Research, Anna has worked on a portfolio of projects related to public health, education, and human services, including several multi-method community needs assessments for Community Action Partnership agencies, public health agencies, and hospitals... Read More →
LM

Lillian McDonald

Managing Director, Twin Cities Public Television
Lillian McDonald is the Managing Director for Twin Cities Public Television’s Emergency Response Services or E-R-S. ERS evolved out of collaborative work between TPT and Public Safety Partners to prepare real time warning and alerts in different languages including Spanish, Hmong... Read More →
KV

Kaolee Vang

Cultural Outreach and Project Manager, Twin Cities PBS

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Greenway Ballroom-I (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.16 Healing Our Communities: What Trauma-Informed Engaged Research Can Teach Us About Enduring Urban Injustice
The call for a trauma informed approach to engaging challenges posed by enduring urban injustices is increasing. What does this mean and how can we analyze increasingly complex social contexts of urban sociality, where notions of race, practices of ethnicity, and political economic forces challenge our existing models? Our engaged research practices here at the Kirwan Institute teach us that trauma, particularly racial trauma, is sociogenic. We see trauma transcending individual psychological wellbeing to include interrelated internal and external factors. Drawing on research and field experience related to critical trauma theory, food security, civic engagement, youth development, and implicit bias research and training, this colloquy brings Kirwan’s interdisciplinary research lens to the intersection between individually focused cognitive and broader socio-structural factors that reflect the interplay between racial inequity and individual and social wounding.


Maurice Stevens, Ohio State University
Glennon Sweeney, Ohio State University
Kelly Capatosto, Ohio State University
Clarence Jackson, Ohio State University

Speakers
avatar for Glennon Sweeney

Glennon Sweeney

Research Associate, The Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Ohio State University

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Greenway Ballroom-J (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.18 Getting Tenure/Promotion –Research, Teaching and Service Strategies (COLLOQUY ORGANIZED BY UAA VICE CHAIR)
The transition to a tenure track position in higher education presents early career scholars with a number of new challenges. Among them is the need to balance research, teaching, and service obligations. Too often, junior faculty members are asked to manage these responsibilities without a great deal of advice from senior faculty. This colloquy was organized to bridge this gap. In it panelists will identify strategies for balancing research, teaching, and service obligations. They will also discuss pitfalls to avoid in these areas. Topics to be discussed include: how to develop a research program and navigate the publication process, the roles of funded and unfunded research in the early stages of academic careers, strategies for effective teaching, and service expectations in the promotion and tenure process.

Edith Barrett, University of Connecticut
Celina Su, City University of New York
Kirk Harris, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Daniel Hammel, University of Toledo

Speakers
avatar for Edith Barrett

Edith Barrett

Director, Urban and Community Studies, University of Connecticut
avatar for Kirk E. Harris, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Kirk E. Harris, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Dr. Kirk E.  Harris is the first full-time tenured African-American faculty member in the Department of Urban Planning, in the School of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. Dr. Harris' academic interests are focused on racial and economic... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo

Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo

Professor, University at Buffalo
Rob Silverman's research focuses on the non-profit sector, the role of community-based organizations in urban neighborhoods, education reform, and inequality in inner city housing markets. His current research projects include studies of non-profit finance and advocacy,school reform,shrinking... Read More →

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Greenway Ballroom-E (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.20 Journal Publishing: What Editors Think You Should Know
Experienced editors from major publishing companies explain the basic guidelines for preparing and submitting manuscripts, and proven strategies for potential authors. Learn to avoid common mistakes, and increase the likelihood of finding the most appropriate journal for your research.

Emma Sanders, Routledge/Taylor & Francis (Moderator)
Simon Jones, Elsevier Publishing
Patrick McGinty, SAGE Publishing


Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
St. Croix (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.01 Local Viewpoints: Resident Perceptions of Redevelopment Efforts
Living in Old Montreal: Housing, Ways of Living, and Resident Perceptions in Urban Tourism Precincts
Priscilla Ananian, Université du Québec à Montréal

The Impacts of Sustainability Practices in Affordable Housing Developments: Perspectives of Residents
Seyeon Lee, Syracuse University

The Performativity of Strategic Planning: Experiences from Aalborg and Copenhagen
Lars A. Engberg, Aalborg University Copenhagen; Jesper Rohr Hansen, Aalborg University Copenhagen

UniverCity as a Complete Community: Identifying Successes, Challenges and Opportunities for Increasing All-day Use of Local Assets

Isabelle Kim, Ryerson University

Housing Policies in the Historic Center of Havana: A Challenge For Universal Access to Housing
Elizabeth Rodriguez Miniet, Centro de Comunicación Cultural

Speakers
avatar for Priscilla Ananian

Priscilla Ananian

Professeure, University of Quebec in Montreal
LA

Lars A. Engberg, Aalborg University Copenhagen

Senior Researcher, Aalborg University Copenhagen
avatar for Isabelle Kim

Isabelle Kim

Master of Planning Candidate, Ryerson University
SL

Seyeon Lee, Syracuse University

Assistant Professor, Syracuse University

Moderators
SL

Seyeon Lee, Syracuse University

Assistant Professor, Syracuse University

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Greenway Ballroom-A (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.03 The Role of Business and Government Policy in Gentrification
The Next Big Thing: High-Profile Targeted Revitalization Projects, Speculation, and Gentrification
Dan Immergluck, Georgia Tech

Gentrification and Displacement: How Government Policy Disrupts Communities
Spencer T. Clayton, Rutgers University, Camden

Towards a Theory of Despatialization: A Comparative Case Study of Commercial Gentrification in Two Chicago Neighborhoods
Steven Tuttle, Loyola University Chicago

Anchoring Downtown: Examining Anchor Investment and Downtown Revitalization in Phoenix
Meagan Ehlenz, Arizona State University

Speakers
ME

Meagan Ehlenz

Arizona State University
DI

Dan Immergluck, Georgia Tech

Georgia Institute of Technology

Moderators
DI

Dan Immergluck, Georgia Tech

Georgia Institute of Technology

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Greenway Ballroom-B (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.04 Challenges to Public Housing Authorities & Public Housing Practices
Reforming One Strike Polices: Redefining the Use of Criminal Backgrounds in Housing Decisions 
Rebecca J. Walter, University of Texas at San Antonio; Jill Viglione, University of Texas at San Antonio; Marie Skubak Tillyer, University of Texas at San Antonio

Remaking Singapore’s Heartland: Sustaining Public Housing through Neighborhood Upgrade Programs
Michael Glass, University of Pittsburgh; Anna Salvador, University of Pittsburgh

The Rental Assistance Demonstration Program and Low-Income Housing Policy Devolution
James Hanlon, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Settling In or Moving Out: Exploring the Effect of Mobility Perceptions on Moving Out
Prentiss Dantzler, Colorado College; Jason Rivera, State University of New York at Buffalo

Opportunity for whom? Public Housing Recovery in Galveston, Texas following Hurricane Ike
Sara Hamideh, Iowa State University; Jane Rongerude, Iowa State University

Speakers
PD

Prentiss Dantzler

Assistant Professor of Sociology, Colorado College
avatar for Michael Glass

Michael Glass

Professor Urban Studies, University of Pittsburgh
avatar for James Hanlon

James Hanlon

Associate Professor, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Associate Professor of Geography. Research interests in urban geography, public and affordable housing, urban policy, and racial segregation and inequality.
RW

Rebecca Walter

The University of Texas at San Antonio

Moderators
avatar for Michael Glass

Michael Glass

Professor Urban Studies, University of Pittsburgh

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Greenway Ballroom-C (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.05 Urban Design for Sustainable Communities

Making a Rooftop Vegetable Garden: Benefits and Challenges
Te-Sheng Huang, Feng Chia University; Chien-Cheng Lee, Feng Chia University

Towards a Reconfiguration of the Fields of Expertise in Urban Planning: The Role of a Water Management Software
Antonin Margier, University Lille 1; Silvère Tribout, University Grenoble-AlpesOlivier Blanpain, University Lille 1

Multi-Layered Public Spaces in Tokyo: Inadvertent By-Products?
Zdenka Havlova, University of Tokyo

Placemaking in Community Development: Reclaiming Abandoned Spaces
Chien-Cheng Lee, Feng Chia University; Te-Sheng Huang, Feng Chia University

Speakers
avatar for Zdenka Havlova

Zdenka Havlova

Research and Teaching Assistant, University of Tokyo
avatar for Te-Sheng Huang

Te-Sheng Huang

Feng Chia University

Moderators
avatar for Bethany Welch, Aquinas Center

Bethany Welch, Aquinas Center

Executive Director, Aquinas Center
Bethany J. Welch, Ph.D. is the founding director of Aquinas Center. Her research on the Catholic Church and urban revitalization prompted Philadelphia’s St. Thomas Aquinas parish to invite her to help them repurpose a former convent to create a space that builds unity in diversity... Read More →

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Greenway Ballroom-D (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.06 Issues in Density and New Urbanism
What's Lost in the Aggregate: Lessons from a Dynamic, Local Index of Housing Supply Restrictions
Christian Redfearn, University of Southern California; Anthony Orlando, University of Southern California

Tracing New Urbanism’s Suburban Intervention in Minneapolis-St. Paul

Dan Trudeau, Macalester College

Spatial Metrics of Urban Form: Measuring Compact Cities in China
ChengHe Guan, Harvard University


Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Lakeshore B (1st Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.07 Place Meaning and Economic Resilience: Visiting the Possibilities
The Role of Place Image in Business Location Decisions
Candi Clouse, Cleveland State University; Ashutosh Dixit, Cleveland State University

Turning Rust into Gold: Hamilton’s Growing Competitive Advantage and the Toronto Linkage
Gidon Jakar, University of Michigan; Jim Dunn, McMaster University

An Assessment of Community Tourism Action Planning: Lessons From Washtenaw County, Michigan
Heather Khan, Eastern Michigan University; William Welsh, Eastern Michigan University; Kelly Victor-Burke, Eastern Michigan University

Speakers
GJ

Gidon Jakar

University of Michigan
HK

Heather Khan

Eastern Michigan University
avatar for Candi Clouse, Cleveland State University

Candi Clouse, Cleveland State University

Program Manager, Center for Economic Development, Cleveland State University
Candi Clouse is the Program Manager in the Center for Economic Development at the Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University. In her current role, she supports the center with data analysis, economic impact modeling, and industry research. Ms. Clouse... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Candi Clouse, Cleveland State University

Candi Clouse, Cleveland State University

Program Manager, Center for Economic Development, Cleveland State University
Candi Clouse is the Program Manager in the Center for Economic Development at the Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University. In her current role, she supports the center with data analysis, economic impact modeling, and industry research. Ms. Clouse... Read More →

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Nicollet Ballroom D-1 (1st Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.08 Going Green: Rhetoric, Action, Results
Unintended Consequences of Food Waste Diversion: Whether and How Spillover Behaviors Improve Urban Environmental Impacts
Sally Geislar, University of California, Irvine; Nicole Sintov, University of Southern California; Lee White, University of Southern California

Pursuing Low Carbon Development for Sustainability and Resilience in Malaysian Cities
Chin Siong Ho, University of Technology Malaysia; Loon Wai Chau, University of Technology Malaysia

Incorporating Public Health into Local Climate Adaptation Planning: Face-to-Face Role-Play Simulations and Online Games in Cambridge, MA
Ella Kim, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Innovations in Energy Electrical Technologies during the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: The Role of Politics
Taekyoung Lim, Cleveland State University

Speakers
Moderators
avatar for Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Sociology Coordinator, Kean University
Currently working at the intersection of urban development and climate change to address the forms in which populations and aid are governed in a forthcoming book about Hurricane Sandy and climate change that will also include alternatives and the proliferation of discourses on preparedness... Read More →

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Greenway Ballroom-G (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.09 Effective Participation Methods 2
Making Frenemies: Fostering Civility and Seeking Solutions Through Civil Discourse Among the Utterly Opposed
Todd Schenk, Virginia Tech

Coming to Terms with the Dearth of Participation: The Participatory Budgeting Experience in Chicago
Mine Tafolar, University of Illinois at Chicago

Analyzing Public Engagement in Four Shrinking Cities in Ohio: Findings and New Approaches
Mattijs Van Maasakkers, Ohio State University; Torey Hollingsworth, Ohio State University; Emily Knox, Ohio State University; Jeeson Oh, Ohio State University

Creating Constituencies: The Boundaries of Participation and Inclusion in Los Angeles Neighborhood Councils
Brian Hui, University of California, Irvine

Speakers
avatar for Todd Schenk

Todd Schenk

Assistant Professor, Virginia Tech
Public participation and community involvement, deliberative democracy, joint fact-finding, serious games, governance of climate change adaptation.
MT

Mine Tafolar

Graduate Student, University of Illinois at Chicago

Moderators
avatar for Todd Schenk

Todd Schenk

Assistant Professor, Virginia Tech
Public participation and community involvement, deliberative democracy, joint fact-finding, serious games, governance of climate change adaptation.

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Nicollet Ballroom D-3 (1st Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.10 Actually Existing Urban Governance
As outlined by Brenner and Theodore (Spaces of Neoliberalism: Urban Restructuring in North America and Western Europe, 2012), an understanding of “actually existing” neoliberalism considers the contextual factors that shape neoliberal projects as they are produced within specific locations. So to comprehend urban governance in the neoliberal arena means reckoning with the many forms it takes in different contexts and spaces. In this panel, we aim to explore examples of varying types of urban governance as they “actually exist” in the world. Examples include urban governance through a variety of lenses, including as policy making and service delivery. Who is involved? What do the the specific forms of governance look like? How are they produced? What are the implications? Are there opportunities for alternatives?

Privatization of Urban Governance and the New Class Structure of Social Impact Finance
Robert W. Lake, Rutgers University

Of Crocodiles and Garbage Dumps: Erasures in ‘Green’ Development
Aparna Parikh, Pennsylvania State University

Questions of Scale and Governance with The Kingsbridge Armory Community Benefits Agreement
Evan Casper-Futterman, Rutgers University

Urban Governance in a Neoliberal Age: The Public-Private Food Assistance Network
Amy Rosenthal, Rutgers University; Kathe Newman, Rutgers University

Speakers
avatar for Evan Casper-Futterman

Evan Casper-Futterman

Rutgers University
RL

Robert Lake

Professor, Rutgers University
avatar for Amy Rosenthal

Amy Rosenthal

Doctoral Student, Rutgers University

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Nicollet Ballroom D-2 (1st Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.12 Social Justice and Education
Safe Spaces Make Good Neighbors? Community and University Engagement in a Time Social Unrest
Vivian Cueto, Florida International University

Parental Engagement in 3D: Examining School Involvment among Hispanic Parents John Brown, Clark University; Erin Graves, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Civic Hackathon as an Engagement Tool for Enhancing Campus Climate: Initiating a Dialogue between Marginalized Communities and Texas A&M University
Bara Safarova, Texas A&M University; Cecilia Giusti, Texas A&M University

Leaders of the Open School: The Racial Politics of Shaping Educational Space
Esa Syeed, California State University- Long Beach

Speakers
avatar for Erin Graves, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Erin Graves, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Federal Reserve Bank of Boston
VC

Vivian Cueto

Florida International University

Moderators
avatar for Erin Graves, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Erin Graves, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Greenway Ballroom-H (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.15 Equal Access to Services
Does the Minnesota Food Access Planning Guide Promote Food Justice?
Fernando Burga, University of Minnesota; Claire Stoscheck, University of Minnesota 

Research on the Intelligent Community Construction from the View of Aging
Dandong Ge, Zhejiang University; Wei Xu, Zhejiang University; Mengyi Fang, Zhejiang University 

Why Don’t Latinos Visit State Parks in Minnesota? Addressing the Park Access Disparity
Fernando Burga, University of Minnesota; Rodolfo Gutierrez, HACER/University of Minnesota

Planning for Bees: What Planners can Learn from Beekeeping Ordinances in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area 
Fernando Burga, University of Minnesota; Ana Heck, University of Minnesota 

Speakers
CS

Claire Stoscheck

Board Member, Central Area Neighborhood Development Organization

Moderators
avatar for Bernadette Hanlon, Ohio State University

Bernadette Hanlon, Ohio State University

Assistant Professor, Ohio State University

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Greenway Ballroom-F (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.17 Rethinking Urban Planning
What is Missing From Reflective Practice?
Melissa Chinchilla, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Ceasar McDowell, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Bringing Rigor to Urban Planning Scholarship: The Need for Conceptual Integration
Timothy Imeokparia, University of Illinois, Chicago

Man with a Plan: Ideas, Discourse, and the Institutionalization of Urban Planning in Chicago
Kari Smith, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Planning, Platforms and Participation: Emergent Social Media Uses around Local Urban Change
Susan Moore, University College London; Scott Rodgers, Birkbeck, University of London; Andrea Ballatore, Birkbeck, University of London

Speakers
TI

Timothy Imeokparia, University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois Chicago Great Cities Institute
avatar for Susan Moore, University College London

Susan Moore, University College London

Lecturer in Urban Development and Planning, University College London
KS

Kari Smith

Urban Studies Programs, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Moderators
avatar for Susan Moore, University College London

Susan Moore, University College London

Lecturer in Urban Development and Planning, University College London

Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 9:25am
Lakeshore A (1st Floor)

9:25am

9:39am

9:40am

FR9.40.00 Community Land Trust Practitioners and Researchers Dialogue: Ambitions, Limitations and the Future
There is much speculation and often hope for the role CLTs are playing/could play in a reconceptualization of land and housing away from speculation and exchange values, and toward stability and use values and governed by democratic collective decision-making. At the same time, CLTs are occupying the increasingly abandoned space dedicated to the provision of permanently affordable housing. Voucherization of subsidies, the expiration of contractually agreed use restrictions, and the demise of public housing as separate from market based land tenure have shrunk non-speculative land tenure and housing stock. In this colloquia, practitioners and activist researchers will address these three values of CLTs (a permanent stock of non speculative land and housing; democratic collective governance of land and housing, and the provision of housing affordable to low and moderate income people). This is one of two panels exploring the possibilities, challenges and contradictions faced by CLTs in practice and theory.

Cameron Herrington, Portland State University
Jeff Corey, One Roof Community Housing
Greg Finzell, Rondo Community Land Trust
Staci Horwitz, City of Lake Community Land Trust
John Krinsky, City College at City University of New York
Michael Brown, Burlington Associates for Community Development

Speakers
avatar for Cameron Herrington

Cameron Herrington

Master of Urban Studies student, Portland State University
Community organizer with Living Cully, a community development and housing advocacy organization in the Cully neighborhood of NE Portland, OR. Master of Urban Studies candidate at Portland State University.

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Greenway Ballroom-B (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.10 Activist Scholarship Special Session: Media as a Tool for Youth Activism: Examples from the University Community Collaborative at Temple University
This session will focus on how high school and college students are challenging negative stereotypes of young people of color in mainstream media. With support from faculty and staff at Temple University, they launched POPPYN, a youth produced TV News Show in 2010. Covering the Black Lives Matter Movement, the Democratic National Convention, budget cuts in education, and racial profiling, among other topics, POPPYN has won social justice and community impact awards. Come and here from and about these citizen journalists who are helping to change how young people of color are viewed and how they view themselves while developing critical media literacy and production skills. This interactive session will include discussion and film clips. Participants include staff (one of whom is an awarding winning film maker and social activist) and youth.

Stormy Kelsey, Temple University
Nichelle Brunner, Temple University
Barbara Ferman, Temple University

Speakers
avatar for Nichelle Brunner

Nichelle Brunner

Communications Coordinator, Impact Hub MSP
Born in Washington, DC and going to college in North Philadelphia, I am used to the media creating skewed depictions of my reality. As a 20-something, I now use media and communications to create the reality I see through my eyes and the voices of those currently underrepresented... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Ferman

Barbara Ferman

Professor, Temple University
Born and raised in Brooklyn (which is still the 4th largest city!), I had an early education about urban areas that was shaped by some very practical activities – turning empty lots into playgrounds, keeping the hand ball court for hours, dodging traffic, and learning the subway... Read More →

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Greenway Ballroom-F (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.16 The Power of Public Space: Exploring the Role of New Urban Park Spaces in Gentrification and/or Inclusion
A growing number of cities are converting disused open spaces to parks such as rail right-of-ways (Atlanta’s BeltLine), elevated tracks (New York City’s High Line and Paris’s Coulée Verte René-Dumont), and former industrial areas (Newark’s Riverfront Park). However, best practices for promoting equity through the development of attractive new public spaces in rapidly changing low-income urban neighborhoods are hard to find. This colloquy will explore lessons for creating and measuring equitable growth in the development of urban park spaces. Discussion will center around Washington DC’s 11th Street Bridge Park, a project to build a $45 million elevated park which will span the Anacostia River by 2019, connecting the relatively affluent communities surrounding Capitol Hill on the west bank to the distressed neighborhoods, such as Anacostia, on the east bank. Declaring that the park will be a failure unless it serves the full interests of those already living in nearby neighborhoods, especially Anacostia, planners have engaged the surrounding communities in designing the park and in establishing 19 recommendations for equitable growth in housing, small business, and workforce development. Early lessons from the Park’s equitable development planning process, strategies currently underway, and the metrics being used to track results will be featured.

Peter Tatian, Urban Institute
Somala Diby, Urban Institute
Fredrica Kramer, Near SE/SW Community Benefits Coordinating Council
Eric Burnstein, Urban Institute

Speakers
FK

Fredrica Kramer

Independent Researcher
avatar for Peter Tatian

Peter Tatian

Urban Institute

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Lakeshore B (1st Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.20 Building Bridges Between the Academy and the Community: Strategies for Applied Research and Public Scholarship (COLLOQUY ORGANIZED BY UAA VICE CHAIR)
Cities face a number of challenges related to housing, education, economic development, neighborhood planning, public safety, social welfare and other aspects of community development. Historically, low-income residents, particularly those from racial, ethnic and other disenfranchised groups have had little input in decision-making related to urban policies that directly impact the neighborhoods where they live. This has led to displacement, a lack of confidence in public institutions, and the reproduction of urban inequality. This colloquium explores the challenges university faculty face when attempting to pursue public scholarship and forge collaborations with communities in order to promote social change. Strategies that scholars at different stages of their careers can use to leverage university resources, pursue applied research, engage stakeholders, empower residents, and build community capacity will be discussed.

Lisa Bates, Portland State University
Lisa Bornstein, McGill University
Kitty Epstein, Holy Names University

Speakers
avatar for Kitty Kelly Epstein

Kitty Kelly Epstein

Professor, Holy Names University and Fielding Graduate University
In 2013 Kitty Kelly Epstein was honored with the Activist Scholar Award at the national conference of the Urban Affairs Association.  This was based on her work in Oakland, California where she led an innovation in democracy that consisted of 41 groups comprised of 800 people whose... Read More →
avatar for Lisa K. Bates, Portland State University

Lisa K. Bates, Portland State University

Associate Professor, Portland State University

Moderators
avatar for Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo

Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo

Professor, University at Buffalo
Rob Silverman's research focuses on the non-profit sector, the role of community-based organizations in urban neighborhoods, education reform, and inequality in inner city housing markets. His current research projects include studies of non-profit finance and advocacy,school reform,shrinking... Read More →

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Greenway Ballroom-H (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.01 Understanding Neighborhood Change
Neighborhoods are “pulling apart” in American cities: while some older neighborhoods are experiencing economic uplift, often driven by the attraction of young professionals to urban life, many neighborhoods are suffering from declining population and increasing vacancies. How do we explain these contradictory trends and what kinds of interventions can be effective in promoting more economically and racially balanced and stable neighborhoods? Too often, neighborhood research has been ensconced in disciplinary silos, relying on limited quantitative data and failing to take into account the broader context that influences neighborhood change. Scholarly neighborhood research is often overly deterministic, leaving little room for effective interventions. It can also be overly generalized, and unable to take into account the local and regional context of action. This panel highlights research that is interdisciplinary, utilizes both qualitative and quantitative techniques, and places neighborhoods in the broader regional and city contexts. One paper reviews the development of theories and methods for studying neighborhood change over the past century and makes the case for a synthesis of different approaches as outlined above. The two other papers report on research in Detroit, Baltimore, and St. Louis. One examines the role of community development financial institutions (CDFIs) in filling lending gaps. The other combines quantitative and qualitative techniques to develop a model of neighborhood change that highlights the role of human agency in addressing uneven neighborhood development.

A Century of Neighborhood Research: What Have We Learned?
Todd Swanstrom, University of Missouri-St. Louis

What Factors Drive Neighborhood Revival: A Qualitative Look at Neighborhood Change
Alan Mallach, Center for Community Progress

Capital Flows, CDFI Roles, and Neighborhoods Patterns in Commercial, Industrial, and Multifamily Investment in Detroit

Brett Theodos, Urban Institute

Speakers
avatar for Alan Mallach, Center for Community Progress

Alan Mallach, Center for Community Progress

Non-resident Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution
TS

Todd Swanstrom

Professor in Community Collaboration and Public Po, University of Missouri-St. Louis
BT

Brett Theodos

Urban Institute

Moderators
TS

Todd Swanstrom

Professor in Community Collaboration and Public Po, University of Missouri-St. Louis

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Greenway Ballroom-A (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.02 Saving and Strengthening Detroit’s Neighborhoods: Can Residents Impact Residential Land Use and Housing?
When urban residential districts undergo rapid change – whether resulting from severe decline or gentrification – many actors emerge to affect whether and how neighborhoods remain intact. In depressed communities after the mortgage foreclosure crisis, residents struggle to save their communities. Public planners, philanthropic foundations, nonprofit organizations and developers emerge with priorities of their own. In some locations, Fannie, Freddie and HUD – compared with private lenders – have become additional actors undermining recovery for urban communities. In gentrifying communities, long-time residents object to changes in the character of their neighborhoods even as public officials and private developers celebrate these. Focusing on the case of Detroit, the question addressed by this panel is whether and how residents can save their neighborhoods and overcome intervening actors who would undermine community driven efforts.

Collective Memory and the Social Impacts of Land Accumulation in Contemporary Detroit Meagan Elliott, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Examining The Neighborhood Impact of Federal and Privately-Owned Foreclosures in Detroit
Eric Seymour, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Saving Strong Neighborhoods from the Destruction of Mortgage Foreclosures: The Impact of Community-Based Efforts
Lan Deng, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; Eric Seymour, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; Margaret Dewar, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; June Manning Thomas, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Speakers
ES

Eric Seymour

University of Michigan

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Greenway Ballroom-C (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.03 Protecting and Expanding the Stock of Affordable Housing
Accessory Dwelling Units: From Granny Flats to Low-Income Housing?
Darrel Ramsey-Musolf, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Anatomy of a Preservation Deal: Innovations in Preserving Affordable Housing from around the United States
Mark Treskon, Urban Institute; Sara McTarnaghan, Urban Institute

Constructing an Urban Middle Class: Labor Unions and Large-Scale Housing in Postwar New York City
Adam Tanaka, Harvard University

No Vacancy: Reduced Turnover and the Housing Shortfall in the Los Angeles Region
Sarah Mawhorter, University of California, Berkeley

Speakers
avatar for Sara McTarnaghan

Sara McTarnaghan

Research Associate, Urban Institute
DR

Darrel Ramsey-Musolf

Assistant Professor, UMass Amherst
California Native. Former planner for the cities of Hawaiian Gardens and Glendora. Research focuses on low-income housing production in California Cities. Teaches Intro to Land-Use, Regional Planning Studio, and Engaging with Global Cities and Global Issues

Moderators
DR

Darrel Ramsey-Musolf

Assistant Professor, UMass Amherst
California Native. Former planner for the cities of Hawaiian Gardens and Glendora. Research focuses on low-income housing production in California Cities. Teaches Intro to Land-Use, Regional Planning Studio, and Engaging with Global Cities and Global Issues

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Greenway Ballroom-D (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.04 Evaluating Public Housing Authority Programs and Policies
Got Wealth? Assessing the Impacts of an Enhanced Family Self-Sufficiency Program on Asset Development 
Anna Maria Santiago, Michigan State University; George C. Galster, Wayne State University

Public Housing Work Requirements: Implementation Lessons Learned
Kirstin Frescoln, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Michael Webb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; William Rohe, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Mai Nguyen, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Disability Policies And Practice Among Local US Public Housing Authorities
Corianne Payton Scally, Urban Institute; Debra Brucker, University of New Hampshire; Whitney Airgood-Obrycki, Ohio State University

Speakers
avatar for Kirstin Frescoln

Kirstin Frescoln

PhD Candidate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
My work focuses on community engagement to improve health and well-being for vulnerable populations. My current work is focused in public housing. I am the former North Carolina State Drug Treatment Court Manager and continue to provide national consultation on local, state, and... Read More →
avatar for Corianne Payton Scally, Urban Institute

Corianne Payton Scally, Urban Institute

Principal Research Associate, Urban Institute
AM

Anna Maria Santiago, Michigan State University

Professor of Social Work, Michigan State University

Moderators
avatar for Corianne Payton Scally, Urban Institute

Corianne Payton Scally, Urban Institute

Principal Research Associate, Urban Institute

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Greenway Ballroom-E (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.05 Land Use, Resilience, and Environmental Issues
Land Use Strategies for Coastal Resilience in Maryland
Amal K. Ali, Salisbury University

Is There a Link between Zoning and Exposure to Air Pollution?
C.J. Gabbe, Santa Clara University

Renegotiating the Environment Towards Development: Planning the New Jersey Meadowlands in the 1990s
Sevin Yildiz, Barnard College

Speakers
avatar for Sevin Yildiz, Barnard College

Sevin Yildiz, Barnard College

Term Assistant Professor, Barnard College, Columbia University
avatar for C.J. Gabbe, Santa Clara University

C.J. Gabbe, Santa Clara University

Assistant Professor, Santa Clara University

Moderators
avatar for Sevin Yildiz, Barnard College

Sevin Yildiz, Barnard College

Term Assistant Professor, Barnard College, Columbia University

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Greenway Ballroom-G (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.06 Culture, Community and Place-making

When is it Our Turn? Constructing Urban Landscapes Through Hoping in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Jonas Nielsen, Humboldt University

The Sustainable Neighborhoods Network: A City-citizen Partnership to Promote More Sustainable Behaviors
Carrie Makarewicz, University of Colorado Denver

Cultural Entrepreneurship in U.S. Cities
Shiqin Liu, University of Iowa; Haifeng Qian, University of Iowa

Studying Arts Participation through New York City’s IDNYC Free Membership Initiative
Melanie Lorek, The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Community Driven Design as a Creative Disturbance in Vulnerable Neighborhoods
Barbara B. Wilson, University of Virginia

Speakers
avatar for Carrie Makarewicz, University of Colorado – Denver

Carrie Makarewicz, University of Colorado – Denver

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Denver
University of Colorado Denver
avatar for Haifeng Qian, The University of Iowa

Haifeng Qian, The University of Iowa

The University of Iowa
Specialized in urban economic development, entrepreneurship, and innovation.
JN

Jonas Nielsen

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
avatar for Barbara Brown Wilson

Barbara Brown Wilson

Author | Professor, Resilience for All | University of Virginia
Barbara Brown Wilson’s research and teaching focus on the ethics, theory, and practice of sustainable community design and development, and on the history of urban social movements. Wilson's current research projects include understanding how grassroots community networks reframe... Read More →

Moderators
YB

Yasminah Beebeejaun

Associate Professor, University College London

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Greenway Ballroom-J (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.08 Advancing Urban Analysis: Methods and Mapping I
Opportunity Maps and Indices: A Study of Existing Measures
Julia Barnard, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The Adjustment Methods of City Land Layout under the Guidance of Spatial Economic Performance and Vitality
Xiaojuan Ren, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology; Xiaojian Chen, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology; Quan Ma, The First Institute of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing

Metropolitan Spatial Patterns of Firm Locations as a Self-organizing System over Time: An Empirical Evaluation in Cleveland–Akron-Elyria, Ohio CSA
Mark Salling, Cleveland State University; Sandal Kaufman, Cleveland State University; Miron Kaufman, Cleveland State University

Creating a Mixed Methods Approach to Operationalize the Social Production of Space within Marginalized Communities
Leonor Vanik, University of Illinois at Chicago

Speakers
Moderators
JB

Julia Barnard, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
St. Croix (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.09 Urban Elections: Funding and Power
Who Funds Municipal Elections?
Brian McCabe, Georgetown University; Jennifer Heerwig, Stony Brook University

Campaign Donations & Electoral Outcomes: Examining the 2014 Municipal Elections in Metro Vancouver
Gary McKenna, Simon Fraser University

The Instrumental Office: The Effect of Framing City Council as a Difference-Maker on a Individual's Interest in Running for an Open Seat
Patrick Meehan, University of Michigan; Shauna Shames, Rutgers University-Camden 

Which Way is Up?--Political Ads and Political Reality in Local Places
Danilo Yanich, University of Delaware

Speakers
avatar for Danilo Yanich, University of Delaware

Danilo Yanich, University of Delaware

Professor, Director, MA program in Urban Affairs & Public Policy, University of Delaware
BM

Brian McCabe, Georgetown University

Assistant Professor, Georgetown University

Moderators
BM

Brian McCabe, Georgetown University

Assistant Professor, Georgetown University

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Nicollet Ballroom D-3 (1st Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.12 Race and the Enduring Legacy of the 1960s
Route 66 of Black Desire: Highways, Postwar Liberalism, and Community Underdevelopment in Newark, New Jersey
John Wesley Johnson Jr, Saint Peter's University

Race, Space and Neighborhood Change: A 50 Year Retrospective of Change in Neighborhoods that Housed Local Chapters of the National Black Panther Party
Charles Warnken, University of Oklahoma

Speakers
Moderators
KG

Karen Gibson, Portland State University

Associate Professor, Toulan School of Urban Studies & Planning, Portland State University

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Greenway Ballroom-I (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.13 Economics and Ethnicity
Ethnic Concentration, Formal Financial Access, and Lender Substitution
Sean Hubbard, University of Texas at Dallas

Internal Appropriations: Multiculturalism and the American Shopping
Mall Gregory Marinic, Syracuse University

Regional Entrepreneurial Ecosystem and Growth of Ethnic Minority Owned Businesses: Evidence from the Kauffman Firm Survey
Qingfang Wang, University of California Riverside; Tetiana Lysenko, University of North Carolina Charlotte


Speakers
QW

Qingfang Wang

University of California Riverside

Moderators
QW

Qingfang Wang

University of California Riverside

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Nicollet Ballroom D-1 (1st Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.14 Urban Health: The Impact of the Physical Environment
Estimating the Health and Well-being Impacts of Area Regeneration Programmes in Scotland: a Quasi Experiment and Difference in Differences Analysis
Daryll Archibald, University of Edinburgh; Zhiqiang Feng, University of Edinburgh; Elspeth Graham, University of St-Andrews

Urban Health, Housing and City Planning: The Forgotten Trinity
Joan Marshall Wesley, Jackson State University; Sophia Sanders Leggett, Jackson State University; Edmund C. Merem, Jackson State University

Colorectal Cancer Screening in Clarksdale and Sheppard Square HOPE VI Population
Ramona Stone, University of Kentucky; Jeffrey Stone, University of Louisville

Speakers
Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Lakeshore C (1st Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.15 Metromobility and Spatial Justice II: The Challenges of Equity Planning and Governance
This panel focuses on spatial justice issues related to bus- and rail-based urban transit. It looks to regimes of metromobility in order to understand how metropolitan transit spaces are produced, by and for whom, and to what effect. Panelists consider the relationships between metromobility and (in)justice in different empirical contexts and through a variety of epistemological postures and theoretical lenses. On the one hand, they trace how transit systems are imbricated in complex relations of urban inequality and oppression. On the other hand, they also explore how transit systems may be planned, managed, and used in emancipatory ways. In so doing, panelists make important contributions to debates about mobility justice and the right to the city.

Selecting the Route: Balancing Development and Equity in Bus Rapid Transit Decision-Making
Dwayne Baker, University of Manitoba; Orly Linovski, University of Manitoba; Kevin Manaugh, McGill University

Equity, Urban Transport, and the Future of City-making
Diane Davis, Harvard Graduate School of Design; Lily Song, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Gentrification or Empowerment? Identifying Effects of Light Rail Transit on Enhancing Socioeconomic Equity
Keuntae Kim, University of Utah; Kathryn Terzano, University of Utah 


Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Lakeshore A (1st Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.17 Smart Cities and Cyber Systems: Problems, Policies, Prospects
Creating Spaces of Public Insecurity in Times of Terror: The Implications of Code/Space for Urban Vulnerability Analyses
Kevin Keenan, College of Charleston

Cyber-Security at the Grassroots: Findings from a Nationwide Survey of Local Government CyberSecurity
Donald F. Norris, University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Laura Mateczun, University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Anupam Joshi, University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Tim Finin, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Beyond “Getting the Kit in the Ground”: Themes and Issues in Smart City Development in England 
Alex Marsh, University of Bristol 

Speakers
DF

Donald F. Norris, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Director, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Donald F. Norris (a.k.a. Don – definitely not Donald!) is Director of the School of Public Policy and Director of the Maryland Institute for Policy Analysis and Research at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. His fields of study include: (1) urban affairs broadly but with... Read More →
avatar for Alex Marsh

Alex Marsh

Professor of Public Policy, University of Bristol
Alex is based at the School for Policy Studies at the University of Bristol, UK, where he is Head of the Centre for Urban and Public Policy Research. At the moment he is writing up a project on local smart city policy and practice in England, based on qualitative case study research... Read More →

Moderators
DF

Donald F. Norris, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Director, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Donald F. Norris (a.k.a. Don – definitely not Donald!) is Director of the School of Public Policy and Director of the Maryland Institute for Policy Analysis and Research at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. His fields of study include: (1) urban affairs broadly but with... Read More →

Friday April 21, 2017 9:40am - 11:05am
Nicollet Ballroom D-2 (1st Floor)

11:09am

11:10am

FR11.10.16 Locating the Scholar in Challenging Urban Injustices
This session rests upon the premise that there are a wide range of views on the role of the scholar and the potential for scholarship to address the actors, arrangements, and processes that produce urban injustice. Participants will reflect on their assessment of the role of the scholar based on their own experience and research, offering their perspectives on the possibilities and limitations of certain modes and methods of scholarship. In addition, attention will be paid to factors that influence the direction scholars take with their research, the methods they employ, and the communities they engage; research is not only shaped by one’s interest, but by funding opportunities, disciplinary trends and research areas, and career-related concerns. The hope is that this conversation will foster a discussion that extends beyond the session and the different views represented in it.

Jakob Schneider, The Graduate Center, City University of New York
Deirdre Oakley, Georgia State University
James Fraser, Vanderbilt University


Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Greenway Ballroom-F (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.30 Building the City of Spectacle: Mayor Richard M. Daley and the Remaking of Chicago
By the time he left office on May 11, 2011, Mayor Richard M. Daley (1989-2011) had served six terms and more than 22 years at the helm of City Hall, making him the longest serving mayor in Chicago’s history.  This session focuses on Daley’s role in transforming Chicago’s economy and urban culture by building what the authors call “a city of spectacle.” During his years as mayor Daley mobilized the city’s corporate and philanthropic elite behind a vision of transformation that often invoked the city’s collective memory of the 1893 World’s Fair, Daniel Burnham, and the 1909 Plan of Chicago. At the same time, he minimized political opposition by bringing leaders of the African-American and Latino communities into his electoral coalition.

Daley has been harshly criticized in some quarters for building a tourist-oriented economy and infrastructure at the expense of other priorities. These concerns were raised at the same time that a long series of corruption scandals erupted, and as the authors show, Daley left his successor, Rahm Emanuel, with serious issues involving a long-standing pattern of police misbehavior, brutality and corruption, under-funded and uneven schools, inadequate housing opportunities, and intractable budgetary crises. Nevertheless, because Daley helped transform Chicago into a leading global city with an exceptional urban culture, he also left a positive imprint on the city that will endure for decades to come.

Costas Spirou, Georgia College & State University
Dennis Judd, University of Illinois at Chicago
Dick Simpson, University of Illinois at Chicago
Annette Steinacker, Loyola University Chicago
Jamie Smith, Indiana University South Bend

Speakers
DJ

Dennis Judd

Professor Emeritus, University of Illinois at Chicago
JS

James Smith

Indiana University South Bend
CS

Costas Spirou

Georgia College & State University

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-3 (1st Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.01 Emergent Political and Economic Possibilities of Community Land Trusts
This session explores the possibilities, challenges, and contradictions faced by Community Land Trusts (CLTs) in practice and theory. The following presentations present new research on the extent to which existing CLTs achieve the goals of developing a permanent stock of non speculative land and housing, democratic collective governance of land and housing, and the provision of housing affordable to low and moderate income people. They also emphasize that actual CLTs emerge in particular contexts, are brought about by different actors with different positionalities, histories, and goals. The research considers whether CLTS achieve changes for residents not adequately captured by political and economic analysis of CLT goals. The panel goes beyond debating the theoretically politically transformative or status quo preservation effects of CLTs to examine different facets of their contributions and diverse genealogies of CLT development. Finally the paper on prefigurative politics asks the question of whether CLTs with diverse genealogies and heterogeneous effects on residents prefigure a transformative politics.

Establishing a Community Land Trust: Does it matter who takes the lead?
Jeffrey Lowe, Texas Southern University

Transforming Discourses and Subjectivities around Homeownership in Community Land Trusts in the Twin Cities, MN
Olivia Williams, Florida State University; Azadeh Hadizadeh Esfahani, Clark University; Deborah Martin, Clark University; Rick Kruger, Clark University Joseph Pierce, Florida State University; James DeFilippis, Rutgers University

The Commodity Effects of De-Commodification: Community Land Trusts and Neighborhood Property Values
James DeFilippis, Rutgers University

The Politics of Community Land Trusts: Comparative genealogies of resident participation
Claire Cahen, The Graduate Center, City University of New York; Jakob Schneider, The Graduate Center, City University of New York; Susan Saegert, The Graduate Center, City University of New York

CLTs as Prefiguration: Postulating the political potential
Kristen Hackett, The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Speakers
JD

James DeFilippis

Rutgers University
KH

Kristen Hackett

City University of New York
JL

Jeffrey Lowe

Texas Southern University

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Greenway Ballroom-A (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.02 Policy and Market Impacts on Race and Class Segregation
Neighborhood Distress and the Geography of the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit
Kirk McClure, University of Kansas; Alex Schwartz, The New School 

Social Capital and Community Building in a Seoul’s Multicultural Community
Hee-Jung Jun, Sungkyunkwan University; Hyung Jeong, Sungkyunkwan University


Speakers
HJ

Hee-Jung Jun

Associate Professor, Sungkyunkwan University
avatar for Kirk McClure, University of Kansas

Kirk McClure, University of Kansas

Professor, University of Kansas
McClure teaches and conducts research in the area of housing market behavior and affordable housing policy.

Moderators
avatar for Kirk McClure, University of Kansas

Kirk McClure, University of Kansas

Professor, University of Kansas
McClure teaches and conducts research in the area of housing market behavior and affordable housing policy.

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Greenway Ballroom-B (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.03 Challenges to Traditional Planning Practice
“Just Spend the Money,” From Empowerment to Compliance. Institutional Frameworks and Empowerment-Based Neighborhood Planning
Brian Price, City of Dallas; Colleen Casey, University of Texas at Arlington

Inclusion & Neighborhood Resiliency
Catalina Freixas, Washington University in St. Louis; Mark Abbott, Harris-Stowe State University

Staying Put – But on What Terms? Examining the Tools to Preserve Affordable Rental Housing in Washington, DC
Kathryn Howell, Virginia Commonwealth University

Informal Settlements on the U.S.-Mexico Border – An Examination of the Old Nogales Highway Colonia
Deyanira Nevarez Martinez, University of California Irvine

Speakers
avatar for Catalina Freixas

Catalina Freixas

Assistant Professor, Washington University in St. Louis
avatar for Brian Price

Brian Price

Senior Planner, City of Dallas
I'm a neighborhood planner with the City of Dallas; my main research interest is in urban governance. As a planner I work in low-income communities to develop neighborhood consensus and vision for the future of their neighborhood. I focus on project management to bring tools, programs... Read More →
avatar for Kathryn Howell, Virginia Commonwealth University

Kathryn Howell, Virginia Commonwealth University

Assistant Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University

Moderators
avatar for Kathryn Howell, Virginia Commonwealth University

Kathryn Howell, Virginia Commonwealth University

Assistant Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Lakeshore A (1st Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.04 Placemaking in Historical Perspective
A New Heart for Old Doha, Qatar; From an Urban Slum to a Sustainable Living Heritage
Djamel Boussa, Qatar University

Building the Modern City: Locating Histories of Resistance in Athens, 1935-1945
Georgios Papakis, Zayed University

Development of Economic Clusters in Transitioning Cities: The Case of Beijing
Zhenshan Yang, Chinese Academy of Science; Liou Xie, State University of New York at Plattsburgh

Placemaking and Embodied Space: Identity and Resistance in a Low-Income Housing Development
Jamie Harris, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

A Strategy for the Seventies: Circular A-95 and American Regional Planning
Carlton Basmajian, Iowa State University; Nina David, University of Delaware

Speakers
CB

Carlton Basmajian

Iowa State University
DB

Djamel Boussaa

Qatar University, College of Engineering, Department of Architecture and Urban Planning
avatar for Jamie Harris

Jamie Harris

Associate Director, Urban Studies Programs, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
avatar for Liou Xie, State University of New York at Plattsburgh

Liou Xie, State University of New York at Plattsburgh

Assistant Professor, State University of New York at Plattsburgh
My education background combines Urban and Economic Geography and Sustainability. I have been spending over 12 years working on urban issues in Chinese cities. More recently I'm moving my search focus to the North Country where I've been living for 5 years. My general research interests... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Liou Xie, State University of New York at Plattsburgh

Liou Xie, State University of New York at Plattsburgh

Assistant Professor, State University of New York at Plattsburgh
My education background combines Urban and Economic Geography and Sustainability. I have been spending over 12 years working on urban issues in Chinese cities. More recently I'm moving my search focus to the North Country where I've been living for 5 years. My general research interests... Read More →

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Greenway Ballroom-D (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.06 Sustainable Cities and Urban Infrastructure: Policy, Networks and Performance Across Scale
This session presents cutting edge research investigating the implications of urban infrastructure services for energy sustainability. This interdisciplinary panel brings together leading scholars of science and technology, public policy, urban management, engineering, and urban affairs. Networks and governance are examined at agency, neighborhood, city and regional scales.

Identifying and Comparing Governance Structures of District Heating or Cooling Systems in the U.S. and Chinese Cities
Kangkang Tong, Universty of Minnesota; Anu Ramaswami, University of Minnesota

Network Governance and Effectiveness on Renewable Energy Integration: A Comparative Case Study on Power Transmission Networks in the United States
Tien Tang, Florida State University

Competition and Collaboration in Local Government Agency-Citizen Interaction for Energy Conservation
Richard Feiock, Florida State University; Cali Curley, Indiana University-Purdue University


Speakers
RF

Richard Feiock

Florida State University
avatar for Kangkang (KK) Tong

Kangkang (KK) Tong

Doctoral Candidate, University of Minnesota
Kangkang (KK) Tong is a Ph.D. candidate in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota. She is conducting research on sustainable cities and infrastructure from an interdisciplinary perspective. The big question driving... Read More →

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Greenway Ballroom-G (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.07 Dealing with Economic Impacts and Resulting Flows
Urban Inclusiveness, Migration and Productivity
Wanyang Hu, University of California Los Angeles; Rui Wang, University of California Los Angeles

Understanding Residential Property Value Impacts of Advanced Bike Facilities
Jenny Hsing-I Liu, Portland State University; Wei Shi, Portland State University

Fracking and its Impact on Municipal Public Finance
Austin Zwick, University of Toronto

Speakers
avatar for Jenny Hsing-I Liu, Portland State University

Jenny Hsing-I Liu, Portland State University

Assistant Professor, Portland State University
Economics, transportation, environment, public policy, carbon tax
avatar for Austin Zwick

Austin Zwick

PhD Candidate, University of Toronto

Moderators
avatar for Jenny Hsing-I Liu, Portland State University

Jenny Hsing-I Liu, Portland State University

Assistant Professor, Portland State University
Economics, transportation, environment, public policy, carbon tax

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-1 (1st Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.08 Quality of Life in Metropolis
Impact of Relocation on Quality of Life (QoL)
Roberto A Cantu-Garza, Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco; Cecilia Giusti, Texas A&M University

Quality of Life, Multimodality, and the Demise of the Autocentric Metropolis: A Multivariate Analysis of 148 Mid-size U.S. Cities
Craig Talmage, Hobart and William Smith Colleges; Chad Frederick, University of Louisville

Speakers
avatar for Craig Talmage

Craig Talmage

Visiting Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurial Stuidies, Hobart and William Smith Colleges
CDS board memberCommunity Development Practice editorResearch on community health and social entrepreneurship

Moderators
avatar for Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

University of Pittsburgh
Sabina Deitrick, PhD, is Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs and Director of Urban and Regional Analysis program at the University Center for Social and Urban Research (UCSUR) at the University of Pittsburgh.  Her research focuses on issues... Read More →

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Lakeshore B (1st Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.09 Urban Politics
The Mexico City Participatory Agenda: Following a Clientelistic Model?
Arturo Flores, Mexico City Electoral Institute

Reforming the Form of Government in Urban Politics
Ulrik Kjaer, University of Southern Denmark; Niels Opstrup, University of Southern Denmark;

The Flint, Michigan Water Crisis and Residents’ Trust in Local and State Government: Planning and Public Policy Implications
Victoria Morckel, University of Michigan-Flint

Speakers
AF

Arturo Flores, Instituto Electoral del Distrito Federal

Instituto Electoral del Distrito Federal
avatar for Ulrik Kjaer

Ulrik Kjaer

Professor, University of Southern Denmark

Moderators
ML

Myron Levine, Wright State University

Wright State University
national urban policy; regionalism; IG relations; Gov 2.0; Urban Politics

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-2 (1st Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.10 Questioning the Creative City?
The Story and the Data: The Role of Creative City Reports in Shaping Urban Cultural Policy
Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller, The Ohio State University; Rene Kooyman, United Nations Creative Economy Initiative

Arts and Bohemia on Walking, Bicycle, and Transit Use
Hyesun Jeong, Illinois Institute of Technology; Brian Knudsen, Carnegie Mellon University; Mary Vansuch, University of Chicago; Terry Clark, University of Chicago

The Discovery of All-Encompassing Six Dimensions while Testing Guttman Scale Validity and Reliability when Scaling Businesses as Urban Cultural Icons
Stephanie Lawrence, Independent

A Comparative Case-Control Test of Employment Growth and Resilience for Areas with High Creative Industry Employment
Carlos Manjarrez, UMD

Speakers
avatar for Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller

Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller

Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University
Dr. Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller (PhD, The New School; MBA, SUNY Binghamton; BFA, University of Michigan) specializes in creative economic development, cultural policy, arts entrepreneurship, and nonprofit management. She examines the ways that cities use arts and culture in planning... Read More →
avatar for Hyesun Jeong

Hyesun Jeong

Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Chicago
Ph.D in Architecture from Illinois Institute of Technology

Moderators
avatar for Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller

Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller

Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University
Dr. Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller (PhD, The New School; MBA, SUNY Binghamton; BFA, University of Michigan) specializes in creative economic development, cultural policy, arts entrepreneurship, and nonprofit management. She examines the ways that cities use arts and culture in planning... Read More →

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Lakeshore C (1st Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.11 Issues in Education Governance and Funding
Moderator: Ryan Yeung, Hunter College, City University of New York

The Spatial Diffusion of Information for Education Policy Decision-making

Zachary Neal, Michigan State University; Jennifer Watling Neal, Michigan State University; Katie McAlindon, Michigan State University; Jennifer Lawlor, Michigan State University Kristen Mills, Michigan State University

Who's Following who? An Examination of National and Sub-National K-12 Philanthropy
Jeffrey W. Snyder, Cleveland State University

Rust Never Sleep: The need for Transparency and Superintendent Contracts
Chris Stream, University of Nevada Las Vegas; Anthony Prato, University of Nevada Las Vegas

It's the Journey, not the Destination: The Effect of Commuting Mode on the Cognitive Outcomes of Primary School Children
Ryan Yeung, Hunter College, City University of New York; Phuong Nguyen-Hoang, University of Iowa


Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Greenway Ballroom-H (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.13 Food, Housing, Health - Basics of Vulnerability
Food Insecurity Transitions and Housing Hardships: Do Immigrant Families Cope Better or Worse?
Christian King, University of Nebraska - Lincoln; Xi Huang, Georgia State University and Georgia Institute of Technology

Successfully Housing the Most Vulnerable Older Individuals
Marcia Bok, University of Connecticut

Urban Food Policy In and Against a NeoLiberal Framework
Alexander Tarr, Worcester State University

Speakers
MB

Marcia Bok, University of Connecticut

University of Connecticut School of Social Work
CK

Christian King

University of Nebraska - Lincoln
avatar for Alexander Tarr

Alexander Tarr

Assistant Professor of Geography, Worcester State University


Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
St. Croix (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.14 Poverty Measurement and Anti-Poverty Policies
Teenagers’ Changing Views of Welfare: The Growing Urban-Suburban Divide, 1992-2012
Edith Barrett, University of Connecticut

Designing and Using a Multidimensional Neighborhood Poverty Index to Identify Geographic Inequality within Cities
Nate Kratzer, Greater Louisville Project

Attempts To Tackle Poverty In The European Union: Results And Failures
Ivan Tosics, Metropolitan Research Institute (MRI), Budapest; Laura Colini, Tesserae, Urban and Social Research, Berlin

Urban Informality and Inequality: The Political Economy of Informal Urban Youth Entrepreneurialism (IUYE) in Accra, Ghana
Thomas Yeboah, University of Cambridge; Emmanuel Frimpong Boamah, University of Louisville

Speakers
avatar for Edith Barrett

Edith Barrett

Director, Urban and Community Studies, University of Connecticut
avatar for Ivan Tosics, Metropolitan Research Institute, Budapest

Ivan Tosics, Metropolitan Research Institute, Budapest

managing director, Metropolitan Research Institute
I am sociologist (PhD) with long experience in urban sociology, strategic development, housing policy and EU regional policy issues. Since 2011 I am one of the Thematic Pole Managers (Programme Experts) of the URBACT programme of the EU, concentrating on knowledge exchange between... Read More →
avatar for Nate Kratzer

Nate Kratzer

Data Wizard, Greater Louisville Project
I work for the Greater Louisville Project while finishing my dissertation in public policy at the University of Kentucky. My research is about poverty and inequality, and focuses on the measurement of poverty.

Moderators
avatar for Edith Barrett

Edith Barrett

Director, Urban and Community Studies, University of Connecticut

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Greenway Ballroom-E (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.15 Activist Scholarship Special Session: Pedagogies of Persistence: Civic Media and Everyday Activism in Urban Spaces
As scholars, teachers, and activists within urban spaces, the contributors to this proposal are all keenly interested in specific forms of classroom and community engagement that can be used to build sustainable models for justice and equality. We are each confronted by the increasing inequality and social fragmentation found in our cities – Miami, Boston, and Las Vegas – and are at the same time bound up within the institutional logics of our universities and communities, as well as connected with the lives of our students. Thus, our project, “Pedagogies of Persistence,” seeks new ways to build on the work of activist scholars that have come before us –W.E.B. DuBois, Paolo Freire, bell hooks – to create modules for engagement that persist in the face of entrenched neoliberal ideologies that have turned our urban spaces into sites of contestation. We are especially interested in the ways that civic media – “the technologies, designs, and practices that produce and reproduce the sense of being in the world with others toward common good” – are created and deployed in support of engaged activism in civic life.

Each of the contributors to this panel will present findings from current projects they are pursuing: in Miami, engaging students in media production and Wi-Fi building in a public housing project; in Boston, a project that brings storytelling skills and social activism game design to underserved communities; and in Las Vegas, the creation of a Communication degree underpinned by a commitment to social justice and focused on standpoint formation and the public interest.

Searching for a signal: Digital literacy, civic engagement, and the building of a community Wi-Fi network in Miami’s urban core
Moses Shumow, Florida International University

Curricular Design and Educating for Social Justice
Christopher Harris, Nevada State College

Everyday Civic Activism & Emerging Citizenship
Paul Mihailidis, Emerson College

Speakers
Moderators
MS

Moses Shumow, Florida International University

Florida International University

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Greenway Ballroom-C (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.17 Activist Scholarship Special Session: Grassroots Efforts at Racial Equality
This panel explores the groundswell of social activism with a close look at several specific examples: participatory budgeting in Chicago with many Latino participants; Black empowerment in Oakland; movement-oriented groups in Tennessee; and the role of heritage in hyper-local neighborhood contexts.

Equitable Development (In)action: Lessons from Downtown Redevelopment in the Washington, DC Suburbs
Willow Lung-Amam, University of Maryland, College Park

Neighborhood Story Streams: A Theory of Sustainability, Culture and Place

George C. Homsy, Binghamton University; Siobhan Hart, Binghamton University 

The Role of Scholar-Activism: How Social Scientists Can Bolster Resistance Movements
Sekou Franklin, Middle Tennessee State University

The Prospects and Dilemmas of Fusing Progressive Grassroots Activism With Electoral Politics In Oakland, California, 2013-2016
Stan Oden, California State University Sacramento

Identifying Collective and System Level Learning: Approaching a Participatory Budgeting Process as a Learning Environment that can be Designed for Agentic Learning
Jose W. Melendez, University of Illinois Chicago
 

 

Speakers
SF

Sekou Franklin

Middle Tennessee State University
Associate Professor of Political Science Coordinator of Urban Studies Minor
avatar for Jose W. Melendez

Jose W. Melendez

Postdoc in Teaching and Mentoring, University of Illinois, Chicago
José W. Meléndez received his doctorate from the Learning Sciences program at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), with a co-discipline in Urban Planning and Policy. His research focuses on the interrelation between the environment, participants, and language and how each... Read More →
SO

Stan Oden

California State University, Sacramento
avatar for Willow Lung-Amam, University of Maryland College Park

Willow Lung-Amam, University of Maryland College Park

Director of Community Development, National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education
Willow Lung-Amam, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor in the Urban Studies and Planning Program and Director of Community Development at the National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her scholarship focuses on the link between social... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Kitty Kelly Epstein

Kitty Kelly Epstein

Professor, Holy Names University and Fielding Graduate University
In 2013 Kitty Kelly Epstein was honored with the Activist Scholar Award at the national conference of the Urban Affairs Association.  This was based on her work in Oakland, California where she led an innovation in democracy that consisted of 41 groups comprised of 800 people whose... Read More →

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Greenway Ballroom-J (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.20 Gender and Social Relations in the Multi Ethnic City
Gendering Urban Space: How Feminist Theoretical Frameworks can help us Explore Social Relations and Inequality in and through Urban Space
Megan Heim-LaFrombois, Auburn University

Girlz to Women: Overcoming the Obstacles to Leadership Faced by Girls and Women in 21st Century U.S. Bicycling
Gwen Urey, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona; Olivia Offutt, University of California, Berkeley

Consuming High-Rises: The Minds of Young Women in Neo-liberal Mumbai 
Ramya Ramanath, DePaul University

Speakers
avatar for Megan Heim-LaFrombois

Megan Heim-LaFrombois

Assistant Professor, Auburn University
avatar for Ramya Ramanath, DePaul University

Ramya Ramanath, DePaul University

Associate Professor, DePaul University
I am Associate Professor at the School of Public Service at DePaul University where I teach graduate courses on sustainable international development, the management of international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), public policy implementation, and cross-sector relations.My... Read More →

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 11:10am - 12:35pm
Greenway Ballroom-I (2nd Floor)

12:35pm

2:04pm

2:05pm

FR2.05.18 A Critical Examination of 'Urban Policy in the Time of Obama'
This colloquy will critically assess the new edited book by James DeFilippis on the urban policy of the Obama Administration. As described by its publisher, University of Minnesota Press, “'Urban Policy in the Time of Obama' explores a broad range of policy arenas that shape, both directly and indirectly, metropolitan areas and urbanization processes. It finds that most of the dominant policies and policy regimes of recent years have fallen short of easing the ills of America’s cities, and calls for a more equitable and just urban policy regime.” Panelists will offer evaluative comments on the book itself, while weaving in their own thoughts and reflections on the Obama Administration’s impact on American cities.

Susan Clarke, University of Colorado
Kimberley Johnson, Barnard College/Columbia University
Larry Bennett, DePaul University
David Imbroscio, University of Louisville

Speakers
LB

Larry Bennett

DePaul University
SC

Susan Clarke

University of Colorado
avatar for Kimberley Johnson, Barnard College

Kimberley Johnson, Barnard College

Director, Barnard-Columbia Urban Studies Program, Barnard College, Columbia Universty

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Greenway Ballroom-J (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.30 Film Screening: Arc of Justice and Street of Dreams
Film Title: Arc of Justice and Streets of Dreams
Name of Film Company: Open Studio Productions/New Day Films
Filmscreening Moderator: John Davis, Open Studio Productions


Description of Film:
Arc of Justice (22min) traces the remarkable journey of New Communities, Inc. (NCI) in southwest Georgia, a story of racial justice, community organizing, and perseverance in the face of enormous obstacles.

Trailer for "Arc of Justice

Streets of Dreams (15min) tells the stories of grassroots activists in communities of color around the U.S. who are using community land trusts (CLTs) to preserve the affordability of their homes, prevent displacement and shape the future of their communities.

This 16-minute video presents inspiring portraits of CLTS in New Orleans, Atlanta, Delray Beach, and Durham, providing compelling case studies for understanding how to advance community economic development in a range of economic environments.
Trailer for "Streets of Dreams"
 
  



Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
St. Croix (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.01 Testing the Impacts of Term Limits, Work Requirements and Other Innovations in Public Housing: Evaluations of HUD'S Moving to Work Program
Since 1996, HUD’s Moving to Work Program (MTW) has allowed a small number of public housing agencies (PHA’s) to experiment with different ways of addressing the housing needs of low-and moderate-income households. Participating PHAs can move HUD funds among budget categories and request waivers from many HUD regulations. Viewed by policy-makers as a way of identifying practices to better serve public housing clients, MTW allows housing authorities to innovate in ways that could be evaluated for nationwide adoption. Unfortunately, scant research has examined the impacts of the various innovations adopted by the participating PHAs, which has severely limited the policy impacts of this program. The purpose of this panel is to highlight ongoing evaluations of MTW programs being conducted by university-based teams in four (of 39) MTW sites: Atlanta, Champaign, Charlotte, and San Bernardino.

MTW Evaluation: Findings from the San Bernardino Term limited Voucher program
Brian Distelberg, Loma Linda University; Lauren Foster, Loma Linda University

‘Time to Say Goodbye’: Household Composition Dynamics and HUD’s Moving to Work Program
Paul McNamara, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Han Bum Lee, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Pathways to Self-Sufficiency: Findings from the Evaluation of the Atlanta Housing Authority’s Moving to Work Demonstration 
Michael J. Rich, Emory University; Moshe Haspel, Emory University; Yuk Fai Cheong, Emory University; Elizabeth Griffiths, Rutgers University; Kelly Hill, Nexus Research; Michael Kramer, Emory University; Michael Leo Owens, Emory University; Lance Waller, Emory University

Moving Up or Moving Out?  Evaluating the Impact of Work Requirements to Increase Positive Exits from Public Housing
Michael D. Webb, UNC-Chapel Hill; Kirstin Frescoln, UNC-Chapel Hill; William Rohe, UNC-Chapel Hill



Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Greenway Ballroom-B (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.02 Theorizing Housing
This panel aims to continue a conversation that started at the UAA 2016 colloquy, Theorizing Housing: What is the State of the Art? The intent is to elevate and expand theoretical scholarship in our quest to study and improve housing conditions. We believe this is especially important and relevant now given the dominance of policy research, which as van Vliet (2003) found is primarily funded by government with policy makers as the intended audience. While grounded in a literature, there is limited reflection on the underlying assumptions or in evaluation research speak “the theory of change” promulgated by contemporary policies such as mixed-income housing.

The goal of this session is to theorize contemporary housing policy problems, to develop insight more so than to simply critique, in order to find new ways of conceiving and responding to them. This includes gentrification, housing affordability, the privatization of social housing, and public housing transformation. Further, we aim to contribute to the different ways of theorizing housing including engaging with and bringing social theory into the housing field as well as making theory about housing as a unique phenomenon. Both approaches provide different opportunities for theorizing housing.

Within the Market or Without? Theorizing Social Housing as Social Property

Sarah Cooper, University of Illinois-Chicago

The Making of the Precarious City
James Fraser, Vanderbilt Unversity

The Geography of (Actually Existing) Opportunity: Housing Choice as Capital?
Andrew Greenlee, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Speakers
avatar for James Fraser

James Fraser

Associate Professor, Vanderbilt University
avatar for Andrew Greenlee

Andrew Greenlee

Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Moderators
avatar for Janet Smith, University of Illinois at Chicago

Janet Smith, University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois Chicago

Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Greenway Ballroom-C (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.03 Housing Markets & Housing Values: Efforts to Produce Desired Outcomes
Impact of Business Improvement Districts: A Spatial-Temporal Assessment of Neighboring Residential Property Values in Los Angeles
Youngre Noh, Texas A&M University; Taehyun Kim, Korea Environment Institute

Mexico’s Housing Paradox: The Political Economy of Inaccessibility and Vacancy in Tijuana, Baja California
Alejandra Reyes, The University of Texas at Austin

Jump-Starting the Housing Market in a Weak-Market City: Results from Midtown and Downtown, Detroit
Avis Vidal, Wayne State University


Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Greenway Ballroom-D (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.04 Responding to Undesired Land Uses and Populations
Passing The Torch: Forcible Evictions Preceding The 2016 Olympic Games
Tyeshia Redden, University of Florida

The View from Here: How Local Decision-Makers Perceive Neighborhood Blight in their Communities
Adenola Osinubi, University of Georgia; Ebunoluwa Odeyemi, University of Georgia 

Compassion & Punishment: NIMBYISM and Federal Goals in Local Homelessness Policy
Melanie Bowers, Rutgers University, Camden

The Politics of Dancing: Results of New Efforts Using Zoning and Land Use Changes to Reduce the Number of Strip Clubs in New Orleans
Robert Collins, Dillard University 

Speakers
avatar for Robert Collins, Dillard University

Robert Collins, Dillard University

Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy, Dillard University
Robert Collins is Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy at Dillard University in New Orleans. Other positions he has held at Dillard include: Associate Provost and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Founding Dean of the College of Arts and... Read More →

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Lakeshore B (1st Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.05 Competing Portrayals and Perspectives on Gentrification
The Attitudes and Agency of Landlords in Gentrifying Neighborhoods
John Balzarini, Delaware State University

Sustainability and Displacement: Assessing the Spatial Pattern of Residential Moves Near Rail Transit in Los Angeles County
Seva Rodnyansky, University of Southern California; Raphael Bostic, University of Southern California; Marlon Boarnet, University of Southern California; Raul Santiago-Bartolomei, University of Southern California; Danielle Williams, University of Southern California; Allen Prohofsky, California Franchise Tax Board

The Portrayal of Gentrification on Television: What the Public is Learning
Del Bharath, University of Nebraska Omaha

Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City
Derek Hyra, American University

Speakers
JB

John Balzarini

Delaware State University
avatar for Del Bharath

Del Bharath

Instructor, California Polytechnic University Pomona
avatar for Derek Hyra, American University

Derek Hyra, American University

Associate Professor, Department of Public Administration and Policy, American University
Derek Hyra is an associate professor in the Department of Public Administration and Policy at American University. His research focuses on processes of neighborhood change, with an emphasis on housing, metropolitan politics, and race. Dr. Hyra is the author of The New Urban Renewal... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Gordana Rabrenovic, Northeastern University

Gordana Rabrenovic, Northeastern University

Associate Professor of Sociology and Director of Brudnick Center on Violence and Conflict., Northeastern University
Gordana Rabrenovic is an associate professor of sociology and the director of the Brudnick Center on Violence and Conflict at Northeastern University. Her research and publications are in the area of community studies and intergroup conflict and violence. Her current work focuses... Read More →

Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Greenway Ballroom-E (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.06 Urbanizing the Suburbs
Across North America, suburban landscapes have been experiencing dramatic change. Concomitant with unrelenting dispersion and sprawl, attempts to introduce urban elements into suburban landscapes has been rapidly gaining ground. Although it is not an all-encompassing process, attempts to insert urban elements in suburban development may be in fact groundbreaking for present-day dispersed environments. Driven by demand by college-educated and talented millennials who prefer urban over suburban living and working environments and corporations that signal their willingness to move back to cities, suburbs have had to come up with alternative development strategies that would make themselves attractive again to residents and businesses alike.
The purpose of this session is to promote discussion on the process of suburban urbanization in the United States and Canada. Papers in this session emphasize state and private initiatives in supporting urban-like development in different types of suburban environments. In what seems to be a swing in pendulum, decision makers and local stakeholders seek to re-engineer suburban settings so that they can regain the power as profitable arenas for capital investment. As a process in the making, plans for mixed-use, dense, walkable, and transit-oriented development in suburban environments present a new phase in ‘urban sub-urbanism’.

Governing the Retrofit: Urbanizing the Suburb, Regionalizing the City
Roger Keil, York University; Pierre Hamel, Université de Montréal Suburban

Suburban Multifunctional Centres as Alternatives to Dispersion? A Canadian Analysis
Pierre Filion, University of Waterloo

Split Personality: City, Small Town, or Suburb?
Gillad Rosen, Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Jill Grant, Dalhousie University

Growth Politics and the Resetting the Edge City: The Case of Tysons Corner
Igal Charney, University of Haifa

Speakers
IC

Igal Charney

University of Haifa
avatar for Gillad Rosen

Gillad Rosen

Senior Lecturer, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
avatar for Roger Keil, York University

Roger Keil, York University

York Research Chair in Global Sub/Urban Studies, York University

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Greenway Ballroom-F (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.07 Activist Scholarship Special Session: Promoting Justice in the City: The Environment
This panel examines environmental justice issues in an urban context. The panel begins with a paper describing sustainability in terms of place-based organizations at the community level. Then, the panel looks at climate change activism at the local level. In conclusion, the final papers focus on case studies of environmental justice activism in Birmingham, AL and in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

The Practice of Urbanism: Doing More with Less in the 21st Century
David Brain, New College of Florida

Climate Change Resiliency and Social Activism: Strategies at the Local Level
Cecelia Walsh-Russo, Hartwick College

Over the Mountain: Environmental Organizations, Citizens Panels and Government Agencies in Birmingham
William Holt, Birmingham-Southern College

Fluid Dynamics: Politics and Social Struggle in São Paulo’s Water Crisis
Isadora A. Cruxên, Massachusetts Institute of Technology



 

Speakers
avatar for David Brain

David Brain

Professor of Sociology & Environmental Studies, New College of Florida
In addition to teaching in an urban studies program in Florida, I am a research associate with the Center for the Future of Places, KTH, Stockholm, where I have taught the fundamentals of urbanism and urban design. Over the past 15 yearsI have developed a consulting practice related... Read More →
WH

William Holt

Birmingham-Southern College

Moderators
WH

William Holt

Birmingham-Southern College

Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Greenway Ballroom-G (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.08 Reconceptualizing Planning, Politics and Governance
Climate Change Multi-Scalar Challenge: Considerations towards an Urban Ethics between the "Anthropocene" and "Governmentality"
Julia Nevarez, Kean University

A Bourdieusian Modeling of Urban Politics Research: Connecting Political Action with Political Communication
Yongjun Shin, Bridgewater State University

Utopianism as a Method for Creating Just Aotearoa New Zealand Cities
Rebecca Kiddle, Victoria University of Wellington; Amanda Thomas, Victoria University of Wellington

Speakers
avatar for Yongjun Shin

Yongjun Shin

Assistant Professor, Bridgewater State University
I am an assistant professor of communication studies at Bridgewater State University. My academic interests are interdisciplinary, including urban politics, community development, communication ecology, urban informatics, communicative place-making, public policy, etc.
avatar for Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Sociology Coordinator, Kean University
Currently working at the intersection of urban development and climate change to address the forms in which populations and aid are governed in a forthcoming book about Hurricane Sandy and climate change that will also include alternatives and the proliferation of discourses on preparedness... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Sociology Coordinator, Kean University
Currently working at the intersection of urban development and climate change to address the forms in which populations and aid are governed in a forthcoming book about Hurricane Sandy and climate change that will also include alternatives and the proliferation of discourses on preparedness... Read More →

Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-1 (1st Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.10 Reclaiming Creativity: Tactics of Agency in the Urban Economy
Within much of urban policy, creativity has been valued narrowly as instrumental mode of economic development and a basis for interurban competition. This session, instead, looks to reclaim creativity as a mode of agency for those that the creative discourse and policy have marginalized. Creativity is more than an economic development buzzword; it is a set of generative and sometimes improvisatory practices that people undertake in the name of economic survival. It is a skill a variety of actors employ, and the session seeks to explore the praxis of creativity in the city as these participants understand it. Using an actor-centered approach, the panel discussion will focus on economic subjectivity in the city, asking how marginalized groups of people navigate the city and exert control over institutions that shape their lives and communities. We ask how people are validated, how they are marginalized, and how they take matters into their own hands to reinscribe their economic identity on their own terms. Examples may include artists, queer communities, street vendors, and so on. We prioritize submissions grounded in story, empirical participant driven data, and research as praxis.

From Creative Economy to Artistic Agency: The Role of the Artists in Urban Change
Benjamin Teresa, Virginia Commonwealth University; Andrew Zitcer, Drexel University

Creative Placemaking on Contested Terrain
Andrew Zitcer, Drexel University

Can ‘Thoughtful Development’ Maintain Artists and Residential Diversity in Arts Districts?
Meghan Ashlin Rich, University of Scranton

Can the marginalized use an inclusive discourse for their own purposes? Impressions from "Creative" Jerusalem
Noga Keidar, University of Toronto

Defending Place in Creative Placemaking
Gordon Douglas, New York University

Speakers
GD

Gordon Douglas

New York University
avatar for Noga Keidar

Noga Keidar

University of Toronto
avatar for Meghan Ashlin Rich

Meghan Ashlin Rich

Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Scranton
My research involves studying race, class, and social change in urban neighborhoods. I am particularly interested in how cities use arts and culture-based strategies to renew blighted areas. My ethnographic studies of neighborhoods in Scranton and Baltimore have been published in... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Zitcer, Drexel University

Andrew Zitcer, Drexel University

Assistant Teaching Professor, Drexel University
Andrew Zitcer has been part of the Philadelphia arts and culture community since helping to found the Rotunda in the late 1990s. The Rotunda is a community-gathering place fueled by the belief that art is a catalyst for social change and that the arts can lead to the formation of... Read More →

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Lakeshore C (1st Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.11 Activist Scholarship Special Session: The Blossoming of Student Voice and Action
This panel will present unique examples of student organizing and voice, alongside unique faculty initiatives to enhance student life, especially for those students experiencing what one author calls "RBF" (racial battle fatigue) One paper presents students resisting the narrative which portrays their urban high school as deficient. Another examines closely a project of mentoring students into leadership, and a third presents work on creating an empathetic university, given the vast differences in ethnicity between students and faculty. The final presentation looks at the physiological and psychosocial realities of student of color activists who are addressing racial equity on college campuses

Engaging Student and Instructor Lived Experience: Creating Empathetic Classrooms and Institutions
Donna Hunter, Stanford; Emily Polk, Stanford University

Training the Next Generation of Activists: A Layered Approach to Mentoring Young People
Barbara Ferman, Temple University

People Don't REALLY Know Canton High: Student Perspectives on their Negatively Viewed Urban High School
Keith Benson, Rutgers University


Speakers
avatar for Barbara Ferman

Barbara Ferman

Professor, Temple University
Born and raised in Brooklyn (which is still the 4th largest city!), I had an early education about urban areas that was shaped by some very practical activities – turning empty lots into playgrounds, keeping the hand ball court for hours, dodging traffic, and learning the subway... Read More →
avatar for Keith Benson, Rutgers University

Keith Benson, Rutgers University

President, Camden Education Association

Moderators
avatar for Keith Benson, Rutgers University

Keith Benson, Rutgers University

President, Camden Education Association

Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Greenway Ballroom-H (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.13 Strategies and Tools for Crime Reduction
Bid'ing for Police: How the Business Improvement District Utilizes Local Law Enforcement
Douglas Cantor, University of Illinois at Chicago

Closing the Gateway: Street Barriers as Public Policy in St. Louis, MO
Christopher Prener, Saint Louis University; Joel Jennings, Saint Louis University; Taylor Braswell, Saint Louis University; Kyle Miller, Saint Louis University; Andrew Smith, Saint Louis University

The Effect of Video Cameras and Proactive Patrol on Crime in Detroit
Lyke Thompson, Wayne State University

Speakers
DC

Douglas Cantor

University of Illinois at Chicago
CP

Christopher Prener

Saint Louis University
LT

Lyke Thompson

Wayne State University

Moderators
LT

Lyke Thompson

Wayne State University

Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-2 (1st Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.14 Job Access and Labor Market Restructuring
Employer Preferences for Bachelor’s Degrees for Select Opportunity Occupations
Keith Wardrip, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia; Stuart Andreason, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta; Mels de Zeeuw, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Towards a Better Understanding of Low-Wage Labor Markets and Job Access: Investigating Commute Times and Patterns of Low-earning Workers
Marla Nelson, University of New Orleans; Laura Wolf-Powers, The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Economic Restructuring and Youth Employment: Implications for Effective Policy Prescriptions
Matthew Wilson, University of Illinois at Chicago


Speakers
Moderators
MW

Matthew Wilson, University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois at Chicago

Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-3 (1st Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.15 Income Inequality and Social Dynamics
Social Processes and Community Structure: Social Capital and Civic Engagement as Mediators of Inequality and Perceived Crime
Charles Collins, University of Washington Bothell; Shelby Guidry, University of Washington Bothell

Urban Revitalization Policy as Shaped by Social Services Providers’ Perceptions of State Responsibility
Einat Lavee, University of Haifa; Nissim Cohen, University of Haifa

Measuring the Middle-Classness of U.S. Metropolitan Areas and its Relevance to Income Inequality
Rosa Lee, George Washington University

Working Poverty in the Canadian Urban System: the Great Crisis and its Effect on Socio-spatial Inequality
Xavier Leloup, Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Montréal; Damaris Rose, Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Montréal



Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Greenway Ballroom-I (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.16 Equity in Urban Planning
Looking for Equity in the MSP 2040 Vision Plan
Fernando Burga, University of Minnesota; Samuel Myers, University of Minnesota; Alejandra Diaz, University of Minnesota

Understanding Economic Development and Gentrification in Communities with High Levels of Environmental Injustice
Adam Eckerd, Virginia Tech; Yushim Kim, Arizona State University; Heather Campbell, Claremont Graduate University

Social Justice through Wastewater Infrastructure Repair: A Case Study of San Francisco’s Sewer System Improvement Program
Miriam Solis, University of California, Berkeley

Speakers
avatar for Fernando Burga, University of Minnesota

Fernando Burga, University of Minnesota

Fernando Burga is an assistant professor for the Master of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP) degree program. His research deals with equity in urban planning particularly in relation to the incorporation of immigrants. He combines planning history, ethnographic fieldwork, and design... Read More →
MS

Miriam Solis

UC Berkeley

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Lakeshore A (1st Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.17 Urban Dispossession: Eviction, Precarity, and Profit in Housing
This panel examines and compares the role, process, and threat of eviction in four cities; Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, and Cleveland. Papers focus on the role of landlords in the process of eviction and the threat of eviction, in the housing market with special attention to the increasing role of large corporate holdings and management companies.

Profiting on Precarity: The Role of Eviction in Baltimore’s Housing Court
Daniel Pasciuti, Georgia State University; Asantewaa Darkwa, Georgia State University

New Corporate Landlords and Displacement: Eviction Rates in Post-Foreclosure Single Family Rentals in Fulton County, Georgia
Elora Raymond, Georgia Institute of Technology, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta; Richard Duckworth, Georgia Institute of Technology, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta; Ben Miller, Georgia State University; Michael Lucas, Atlanta Volunteer Lawyers Foundation; Shiraj Pokarel, Georgia State University

The Threat of Eviction
Philip ME Garboden, Johns Hopkins University; Eva Rosen, Johns Hopkins University

Speakers
PG

Philip Garboden

Johns Hopkins University
avatar for Ben Miller

Ben Miller

Assistant Professor, Georgia State University
Digital Humanist researching collective memory in data with NLP and narrative theory.
avatar for Daniel Pasciuti

Daniel Pasciuti

Assistant Professor, Georgia State University
I am a comparative-historical sociologist and Assistant Professor at Georgia State University. I am also a Research Scientist in the Arrighi Center for Global Studies at Johns Hopkins University. My research interests include comparative-historical sociology, historical capitalism... Read More →
avatar for Eva Rosen

Eva Rosen

Assistant Professor, Georgetown University

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Greenway Ballroom-A (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

3:30pm

3:30pm

FR3.30.01 Orange Agendas: Transportation Infrastructure, Identity, and Heritage in the Urban Development of Lahore, Pakistan
This research poster intends to explore the complexities of contemporary Lahori identity manifested by the contentious relationship between its past and future - illuminated by the present construction of the Orange Line urban transport system. Via a discussion of Lahore’s unique context, the investigation will further illustrate the broader conflicted agendas of contemporary South Asian cities to balance their varied development goals and the simultaneity of past/present/future urban development.

Ziad Qureshi, The University of Houston
Naeem Qureshi, Progressive Consulting Engineers, Inc.


Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.02 Revisiting Municipal Fiscal Sustainability: A Comparative Study of Detroit vs. New York City
Using fiscal data from the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, this research compares two cities of interest (Detroit and New York City), and conducts time-series analysis from 1977 to 2012. I aim to 1) compare fiscal arrangements, and fiscal sustainability measures between the two cities; 2) detect possible structural breaks when fiscal shifts occur at points in time; 3) identify major determinants that expose cities to fiscal volatility, and their potential impact on municipal fiscal sustainability.

Rongrong Wei, Virginia Tech

Speakers

Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.03 Permanent Data, Transient Population: The Integration of Spatial Analysis in Annual Point-in-Time Counts
This poster will present the mobile data collection techniques utilized as well as maps showing the prevalence of street homelessness throughout St. Louis. The results of this endeavor will explore homelessness on the macro-level through quantitative methods, rather than using the traditional qualitative methods to describe homelessness at a geographically specific area. It also accomplishes a federal goal of the Point-in-Time count of designating areas in particular need of intervention. My analysis will focus on this goal and will allow me to suggest potential sites of intervention based on a spatial analysis of PIT encounters.

Kyle Miller, Saint Louis University

Speakers

Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.04 Place, Social Services Access and Family Well-Being: A Synthesis Review
There is burgeoning literature examining the interaction between place, social services access and family well-being, but no efforts have been made so far to systematically review this line of research. To fill this gap, this paper synthesizes current literature on the role of social services in influencing family well-being by searching through key electronic databases and relevant journals.  Findings from this study imply that despite increasing interest in understanding the interaction among place, social services access and family well-being, more studies guided by theoretical framework and specifying social services access could enrich current literature, so we can gain a better understanding of how social services access in local areas influences low-income families' well-being.

Yiwen Cao, Ohio State University 

Speakers

Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.05 The Sociodemographic Makeup of North Carolina’s Floodplains
While research has been conducted on sociodemographic factors, such as race, class and gender, and their relationships to social and physical vulnerability to flooding, very little attention has been paid to the correlation between sociodemographic factors and exposure to flooding. This project examines this relationship by conducting an analysis of the racial, ethnic, class and gender makeup of the 100-year floodplains of North Carolina using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques, US Census block-group level data and parcel data.

Fayola Jacobs, Texas A&M University

Speakers

Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.06 Race, Land Use Regulation, and Housing Affordability in Metropolitan America
Utilizing a multilevel regression design analyzing Wharton Residential Land Use Regulation Survey and 2005-09 American Community Survey and Public Use Microdata Sample data, this study illuminates the impact of various kinds of exclusionary land use regulation on metropolitan housing affordability by race. It specifically examines the influence of housing supply and density restrictions on housing affordability for African-Americans, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic white households in 65 metropolitan areas.

Christopher Wheeler, Rutgers University Camden

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Wheeler

Christopher Wheeler

Rutgers University Camden


Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.07 Youth Participatory Action Research on the West Boulevard Corridor
This study centers on learning from practice, as we develop a youth planning and organizing group with focus on healthy community building. The study area is the West Boulevard Corridor, an inner city area in Charlotte North Carolina, predominately made up of low-income minorities. This project uses youth participatory action research (YPAR) to form a youth coalition as an intervention to local issues. YPAR methods will inform the implementation of an intervention that fosters a youth group, with an emphasis on partnership and empowerment rather than service provision. The actions taken in this research will create an opportunity to learn from praxis, while giving youth the opportunity to become advocates for their community. This study is unique in that it merges planning and health with a specific emphasis on youth empowerment and leadership, while also contributing to a larger conversation about youth and participatory planning.

Speakers
avatar for Jamese Pinkston

Jamese Pinkston

Research Assistant, University of North Carolina at Charlotte


Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.08 Exploring the Impact of Community Oriented Policing on Reports of Neighborhood Satisfaction
Many of the nation’s police departments have adopted community-oriented policing (COP) to supplement more traditional reactive models of policing. COP requires police agencies to collaborate with citizens and other community stakeholders to identify issues of concern, develop strategies to prevent crime, and support healthy neighborhoods. Prior research suggests that crime and signs of physical and neighborhood disorder (e.g., litter, noise, public intoxication, etc.) impact residents’ neighborhood satisfaction and may affect their decision to move. This project evaluates the impact of COP on residents’ reported level of neighborhood satisfaction by linking together respondent-level housing survey data and agency-level police department data. Multivariate modeling is used to assess the relationship between COP and resident evaluations of neighborhood satisfaction.

Ron Malega, Missouri State University

Speakers
RM

Ron Malega

Missouri State University


Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.09 Understanding Neighborhood Stabilization and Decline through Municipal Governance Success and Failure: A Study of Six St. Louis Municipalities
This presentation is derived from qualitative case studies of six St. Louis municipalities' policy decisions from 1980 to 2010, analyses of empirical studies, public documents, interviews, and scholarly articles to better understand the critical factors that influence success and failure of municipal governments in stabilizing inner suburbs, racially and economically. During the 1980s, the largest racial transitions and flight of middle-class families in the nation did not occur in central cities, but in the inner suburbs of major metropolitan cities like St. Louis, MO. This mass exodus of middle-class residents from the inner-ring was accompanied by the entrance of low-income families, racial tipping, and neighborhood decline. While this transition accounts for some of the related challenges observed in today’s older, inner-ring suburbs like Ferguson, MO, it does not tell the full story. However, amid decline in neighboring areas some inner suburbs have managed to stabilize and some have experienced economic growth and increased racial diversity.  A few anticipated findings include: municipal government succeeds when policy creates mix-use space and fails when it isolates its poor.

Napoleon Williams III, University of Missouri-St. Louis


Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.10 Concentrated Poverty, Racial Segregation, and Health: The Spatio-temporal Dynamics Shaping Health Outcomes across U.S. Metropolitan Regions
This paper recognizes a gap in the research by way of looking at the effect of concentrated poverty on the processes furthering disparities in health attainment through economic isolation of neighborhoods and increasing geographic marginalization of urban population groups. The analysis consists of a series of multilevel models of a panel of 86 contiguous U.S. MMSAs (Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas) for the years 2001 through 2010 using merged BRFSS and ACS data at both the individual and MMSA levels of analysis. Spatial indices of racial segregation and poverty concentration are constructed using the Global Moran’s I spatial autocorrelation measure estimated in GIS software. Preliminary results show significant association exists across MMSAs between indicators of individual level health and the patterning of concentrated poverty (census tracts poverty rate over 40%) – meaning that the spatial concentration of poverty works to exacerbate the impact of person level poverty at a given level of metro wide poverty. However, the association becomes mixed when introducing a spatial racial residential segregation index. Finally, the paper concludes with practical implications for urban policy solutions toward expanding the scope to include social and economic policies as they bear on the health inequities among urban communities.

Straso Jovanovski, Rutgers University - Camden

Speakers
avatar for Straso Jovanovski, Rutgers University - Camden

Straso Jovanovski, Rutgers University - Camden

PhD Candidate, Public Affairs (Community Development track), Rutgers University - Camden
I am interested in community-level health care delivery; studying the impact of health care initiatives and programs targeted at vulnerable populations in the distressed urban environment. I like using GIS mapping software in portraying trends and patterns relating to health care... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.11 Assessing Physical and Social Vulnerability of Neighborhoods After Floods Using Remote Sensing Imagery and GIS
Finding populations that are vulnerable to disaster is one of the most crucial steps in hazard mitigation planning. Previous studies have been rich in identifying the disproportionate impacts of disaster on socially vulnerable communities, but failed to examine the jointed impacts of physical and social vulnerability on property damages by individuals. To fill this gap, this study attempts to find whether vulnerable households would have more property damages during the hydro-metrological disasters (including hurricanes, flash floods, tropical storms, and tornados), which occurred from 2006 to 2015 in Cameron County, Texas. The main purpose of this study is to examine how physical environment and social vulnerability affects property damages of low-income Hispanic homeowners by disasters. Specifically, impervious surface cover and vegetation cover were used to measure physical environment. Social vulnerability is measured mainly focusing on ethnicity and income level. In addition, populations were defined as low-income Hispanic homeowners who owned single-family homes or mobile homes. Data sources were integrated including the GIS data, high-resolution remote sensing imagery, property appraisal data, census data and injury and damage data, to conduct the GIS analysis.

Kijin Seong, Texas A&M University
Shannon Van Zandt, Texas A&M University

Speakers
avatar for Kijin Seong, Texas A&M University

Kijin Seong, Texas A&M University

Ph.D. Student in Urban and Regional Sciences, Texas A&M University


Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.12 Community Building with Urban Care Farming
European research on rural care farming has shown it to be an effective means of therapy for vulnerable populations that have experienced neglect or trauma, such as individuals with learning disabilities and the formerly incarcerated. However, what role can care farming play in building a sense of community amongst at-risk urban youth? Specifically, does care farming influence how continuation students see their urban school community? This paper aims to answer these questions through community-based participatory research with continuation students at John R. Wooden High School (JRWHS) in Reseda, California. With many of the students facing personal traumas and feeling neglected by standardized schooling, JRWHS students have found their one-acre urban school farm to be educationally and personally enriching. Using civic ecology as a lens in which to view care farming, this paper anticipates to see community building as inherently part of care farming. Indicators of community, such feelings of belonging and having an influence, will be examined alongside JRWHS students’ stories through focus groups, interviews, and observations.

Jesse Flores, University of California Los Angeles

Speakers

Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.13 Twenty Years of Car Sharing in Vancouver
The City of Vancouver has a rich history of car sharing having been the second city in North America to have a provider, with the launch of the co-operative Auto Network (now named Modo) in 1997. Fast forward to 2016 and there are now four car share providers, totaling 150,000+ members and 2,000+ vehicles. Vancouver identifies car sharing as a tool to reduce vehicle dependency, by encouraging households to become car-lite or car-free. The City sees car sharing as part of the solution to achieving 66 percent of trips on foot, bike, or transit by 2040. My research seeks to understand when and how the City of Vancouver first saw car sharing as a means to manage transportation demand. Through content analysis and in person interviews the research will examine the role the City of Vancouver has had in accelerating car sharing. It is anticipated that my research will find that Vancouver has played a significant role in accelerating car sharing.

Mitchell Shaw, Simon Fraser University

Speakers
MS

Mitchell Shaw

Simon Fraser University


Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.14 Open Eyes, Open Minds: Discovery and Mobility Interventions for At-Risk Urban Adolescent Populations
In high poverty urban neighborhoods, there is a lack of financial resources, limited access to start-up capital and immediate economic opportunities. Individuals largely interact with other under-resourced individuals, arguably hindering consistent exposure to mainstream norms and ultimately limiting opportunities for mobility. For instance, in high poverty urban settings, there is a relative lack of networked social and occupational connections. There is a lack of exposure to middle-class academic opportunities and higher education institutions. There is a lack of exposure to professional occupational activities, such as doctors, lawyers, therapists, analysts, and accountants. There is a lack of exposure to middle-class banking and financial institutions, including financial literacy and investment techniques. The challenges for exposure, mobility and success are daunting in high poverty settings. In response, I propose innovative community-based interventions under the umbrella title, Open Eyes, Open Minds, for at-risk adolescent urban populations. In pursuit of evening the odds for success, Open Eyes, Open Minds, interventions seek to expose at-risk adolescent urban populations to the experiences and pathways to success enjoyed by middle-class families.

Adam Butz, California State University, Long Beach

Speakers

Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.15 Race, Equity, and Transportation: A Critical Examination of Metropolitan Planning Organizations
Urban areas are profoundly shaped by the decisions made by Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs). Despite federal law directing MPOs to consider equity and ensure that their decisions do not disproportionately disadvantage minorities or low-income populations, billions of dollars are allocated annually by governing boards that are disproportionately white and biased in favor of suburban interests. However, relatively little is known about how the governance structures, processes or outputs of MPOs impact regional outcomes. Utilizing a case study approach, this paper offers an in-depth look at the structures and processes contributing to patterns of inequity and the tools that hold the promise for disrupting them.

Erica Briggs, Michigan State University

Speakers

Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.16 Assessing Economic Revitalization among New Jersey Municipalities: A Camden Case- Study
While some cities began to rebound in the 1990s, having made significant revitalization strides, others, like Camden, have continued to decline, with any asserted revival failing to trickle down to residents. In July of 2002, the state of New Jersey enacted the Municipal Rehabilitation and Economic Recovery Act (MRERA), which was mandated to initiate a major redevelopment effort for Camden. The Camden’s revitalization plan was a direct effort to approach the city’s poverty and unemployment issues at the highest level. For more than two decades, the State of New Jersey has funded a variety of initiatives aimed at spurring economic development and job creation in the City of Camden. A key empirical question arises, are the city and its residents really reaping the benefits of these initiatives and how do these efforts compare to those made in other similarly distressed municipalities in the state? We use public datasets to analyze all 565 NJ municipalities and 1996-2016 New Jersey Municipal Distress Index Rankings. We attempt to provide a detailed portrait of the underlying forces perpetuating distressed cities and provide the baseline for comparison between Camden and localities across the state.

David Okereke, Rutgers University - Camden
Straso Jovanovski, Rutgers University - Camden

Speakers
avatar for David Okereke, Rutgers University - Camden

David Okereke, Rutgers University - Camden

Ph.D. Student, Rutgers University


Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.17 Business Clusters, Urban Neoliberalism, and the Entrepreneurial City: Has Something Important been Lost between Competing Narratives
A careful examination of the literature suggests the presence of a lacuna in discourses with the failure to discuss other very important processes which also impacted the urban political-economy – in particular the restructuring of urban economies and their surrounding economic regions around emerging clusters, and the role public and private entrepreneurs played in this process. At the start of the 20th Century many post-industrial cities have emerged with revitalized downtown spaces as well as economic clusters built on advanced producer services, healthcare, and high-technology industries. To fully understand the post-industrial city, its emerging systems of governance, its economic structure, and the social consequences of these transformations, it is necessary to expand the discourse on ‘urban neoliberalism’ and the ‘entrepreneurial city’ beyond its narrow emphasis on transformations in the built environment in the urban core.

Craig Barham, University of Louisville

Speakers
CB

Craig Barham

PhD Student, University of Louisville, School of Urban and Public Affairs
I received my bachelor’s degree in Management and Economics from the University of the West Indies, Jamaica and a master’s degree in Public Administration from the University College of the Caribbean, also in Jamaica. I attended the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in the United... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.18 Teaching for Social Justice
This poster discusses a pedagogical experiment in teaching community organizing in the political science classroom by partnering with a local broad-based community organization. The project grows out of multiple strands of best practices in urban higher education. Growing out of a strategic planning process that urged the university to think of itself as an anchor institution, as an “outside-in university” that learns from community members and partners with community organizations in a way that ensures the community partners benefit from student community engagement, as having a duty to seek out talent in the community and the region, and that sees its fate as linked to the well-being of Newark and the region, this course seeks to implement some of those goals in the engaged political science classroom. Students spend the fall semester learning the theory and skills of IAF community organizing, from the instructor as well as leaders of Jersey City together, the community partner organization, and developing group projects that grow out of the goals and interests of Jersey City Together. These projects will be designed in the fall semester and implemented in the spring semester. This poster will report on the success to date of the project.

Jyl Josephson, Rutgers University-Newark

Speakers

Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:30pm

FR3.30.19 Of Suspicious Minds? Race, Scandal, and the DC Mayoralty
Local governments have had a long and storied tradition of corruption and, over time, black mayors have been the disproportionate targets of the federal dragnet. Yet, despite the attention given to public corruption, the racial politics of political scandals has received limited scholarly attention. This is a precarious omission given the schematic linking of race and the untoward behavior of elected officials, especially in American cities. The extent and persistence of corruption and other ethical transgressions raise a number of important questions, including whether, for example, there racial differences in political ethics – i.e., the “practice of making moral judgments…” about elected officials accused of impropriety? And, if so, why? Using survey data from the Washington Post, I examine these questions in view of how D.C. residents responded to the ethics cases of two mayors – i.e., the drug arrest of Marion Barry and the corruption case against Vincent Gray. I show that there is an important racial difference in how black and white voters responded to each incident, and highlight that blacks’ suspicion of racial harassment of both black mayors played an important role in influencing their political judgments.

Nyron Crawford, Temple University

Speakers

Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Mirage (2nd Floor--foyer area)

3:59pm

4:00pm

FR4.00.05 Contribution to the Field of Urban Affairs--Celebrating the Work of Susan Clarke, University of Colorado
Dr. Susan Clarke is the recipient of the 2017 Contribution to the Field of Urban Affairs Award.  An internationally known and respected scholar in urban politics, Susan has published widely and mentored cohorts of successful scholars.  This session will review some of her many achievements.  The session is open to all conference attendees.

Maureen Donaghy, Rutgers University-Camden
Ed Goetz, University of Minnesota
Michael Pagano, University of Illinois at Chicago
Michael J. Rick, Emory University
Mara Sidney, Rutgers University-Newark

Speakers
avatar for Maureen Donaghy, Rutgers University, Camden

Maureen Donaghy, Rutgers University, Camden

Associate Professor, Rutgers University
SC

Susan Clarke

University of Colorado
MP

Michael Pagano

Dean, College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago
city finances, urban affairs, infrastructure, development, intergovernmental system,soccer
MJ

Michael J. Rich

Emory University

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-3 (1st Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.01 Publishing in Urban Affairs: Meet the Editors
This colloquy is organized by the editors of the Journal of Urban Affairs. The panelists are editors from the Journal of Urban Affairs and Urban Affairs Review and they will discuss “how to” and “what not to do” to publish successfully in urban affairs journals. The panel will also discuss the importance and the role of reviewers and how to be a good reviewer.

Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University
Jered Carr, University of Illinois at Chicago
Eric Clark, Lund University
Annette Steinacker, Loyola University Chicago

Speakers
JC

Jered Carr

University of Illinois at Chicago
avatar for Eric Clark

Eric Clark

Professor, Lund University
IV

Igor Vojnovic

Michigan State University

Moderators
IV

Igor Vojnovic

Michigan State University

Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
St. Croix (2nd Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.04 A Tribute To The Life and Work of Robert Warren (Professor Emeritus, University of Delaware)
This session is in honor of Dr. Robert (Bob) Warren (University of Delaware) whose 50+ years of scholarship and mentoring contributed to the growth of the field of urban affairs.  Panelists will share their personal and professional reflections on Bob's significant scholarship and towering figure as a mentor to multiple generations of graduate students and junior colleagues.

Speakers:
Julia Nevarez, Kean University
Mark Rosentraub, University of Michigan
Margaret Wilder, Urban Affairs Association
Danilo Yanich, University of Delaware
Stacy Warren, Eastern Washington University

Speakers
avatar for Danilo Yanich, University of Delaware

Danilo Yanich, University of Delaware

Professor, Director, MA program in Urban Affairs & Public Policy, University of Delaware
avatar for Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Sociology Coordinator, Kean University
Currently working at the intersection of urban development and climate change to address the forms in which populations and aid are governed in a forthcoming book about Hurricane Sandy and climate change that will also include alternatives and the proliferation of discourses on preparedness... Read More →
avatar for Margaret Wilder

Margaret Wilder

Executive Director, Urban Affairs Association
Ph.D. in Urban Geography and Urban Planning (University of Michigan); M.A. and B.A. degrees from University of Texas-Arlington. Began academic career at Indiana University, attained tenure as faculty member at Cornell, served as department chair at SUNY-Albany (Geography/Planning... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Danilo Yanich, University of Delaware

Danilo Yanich, University of Delaware

Professor, Director, MA program in Urban Affairs & Public Policy, University of Delaware

Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-2 (1st Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.10 Place, Race, and the Minnesota Paradox: Or, How Is It that Minnesota Ranks Among the Best Places to Live But Has Some of the Largest Racial Disparities?
Samuel Myers, Jr., University of Minnesota; 2017 recipient of the UAA-SAGE Marilyn Gittell Activist Scholar Award discusses his work that illuminates the contradiction between the MInnesota reputation as a "best place to live," amidst continuing high levels of racial disparities.  Two discussants add their perspectives on this paradox.

Discussants: Dr. Bruce Corrie, Concordia University; Jo Anne Stately, Minneapolis Foundation

Moderator: Judge Lajune Lange (retired), Roy Wilkins Center for Human Relations and Social Justice/International Leadership Institute


Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Nicollet Ballroom D-1 (1st Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.11 Film Screening: 70 Acres in Chicago: Cabrini Green
Film Title: 70 Acres in Chicago: Cabrini Green
Name of Film Company: Ronitfilms
Filmscreening Moderator: Ronit Bezalel, Ronitfilms
 
Description of Film:
Filmed over a period of 20 years, 70 Acres in Chicago chronicles the demolition of Chicago's Cabrini Green public housing development, the clearing of an African-American community, and the building of mixed-income communities on the valuable land where Cabrini once stood. 70 Acres in Chicago tells the volatile story of this hotly contested patch of land, while looking unflinchingly at race, class, and who has the right to live in the city.
Trailer for "70 Acres in Chicago: Cabrini Green"



Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-A (2nd Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.12 Film Screening: Daddy Don't Go
Film Title: Daddy Don't Go
Name of Film Company: Pureland Pictures
Filmscreening Moderator: Suzette Burton, Pureland Pictures

Description of Film:

Captured over two years, Daddy Don't Go is a feature length documentary about four disadvantaged fathers in New York City as they struggle to beat the odds and defy the deadbeat dad stereotype.
Trailer for "Daddy Don't Go"

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-C (2nd Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.13 Film Screening: East LA Interchange
Film Title: East LA Interchange
Name of Film Company: Bluewater Media
Filmscreening Moderator: Betsy Kalin, Bluewater Media
Filmsreening Speaker: Ruby Gómez, Bluewater Media

Description of Film:

East LA Interchange follows the evolution of working-class, immigrant Boyle Heights from multicultural to predominantly Latino and a center of Mexican-American culture. Boyle Heights was once more diverse than most U.S. cities; Latinos, Asians, African-Americans, and the largest settlement of Jews west of Chicago lived and worked together side by side. Targeted by government policies, real estate laws and California planners, the neighborhood survived the building of the largest and busiest freeway interchange system in North America. The documentary explores how the freeways – a symbol of Los Angeles ingrained in America’s popular imagination – impact Boyle Heights’ residents: literally, as an environmental hazard and structural blockade and figuratively, as a conversational interchange about why the future of their beloved community should matter to us all.
Trailer for "East LA Interchange"
www.eastlainterchangefilm.com

Speakers
avatar for Betsy Kalin, Itchy Bee Productions

Betsy Kalin, Itchy Bee Productions

Director/Producer, Bluewater Media
Filmmaker Betsy Kalin will be attending with her most recent documentary East LA Interchange which has won ten jury and audience awards to date. She is an award-winning producer/director at Itchy Bee Productions and Bluewater Media. Her films Roof, Hearts Cracked Open, Chained!, and... Read More →

Moderators


Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-E (2nd Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.14 Film Screening: Free to Ride
Film Title: Free to Ride
Name of Film Company: Kirwan Institute
Filmscreening Moderator: Glennon Sweeney, Kirwan Institute
Filmscreening Speaker: Matthew Martin, Kirwan Institute  
 
Description of Film:
Premiering at the 2017 DC Independent Film Festival in February, Free To Ride is the first feature-length documentary to be produced by the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity. The film follows the story of a relentless grassroots coalition from across Dayton, Ohio who overcame a suburban contingent opposed to public transit, and the system of checks and balances that allowed justice and reason to prevail. Amid growing economic inequality, Free To Ride shows that peaceful change is possible and underscores the power of a multi-racial collective to protect the civil rights of all.
Trailer for "Free to Ride"

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Martin

Matthew Martin

Senior Researcher, Kirwan Institute
Matt has been on staff at the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity since 2009 and the focus of his work has been on expanding access to opportunity, neighborhood revitalization, and the history behind regional inequality. He has managed many of the Institute’s mapping... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Glennon Sweeney

Glennon Sweeney

Research Associate, The Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Ohio State University


Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-J (2nd Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.15 Film Screening: Gaining Ground
Film Title: Gaining Ground
Name of Film Company: Holding Ground Productions/New Day Films 
Filmscreening Moderator:
John Davis, Open Studio Productions 

Description of Film
:
Foreclosures. Unemployment. Childhood poverty. All these problems have hit American communities hard during the Great Recession. Gaining Ground, a follow-up to the award-winning documentary Holding Ground (1996), shows how one diverse Boston neighborhood has managed to stem the tide against enormous odds. Building on a 25-year legacy of innovative community organizing, a new generation of Dudley Street neighborhood leaders has managed to foster hope and create opportunity in challenging times.
Trailer for "Gaining Ground"



Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-H (2nd Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.16 Film Screening: MILWAUKEE 53206
Film Title: MILWAUKEE 53206
Name of Film Company: Transform Films Inc.
Filmscreening Moderator:  Anne Faustin, Odyssey Networks
Filmscreening Speaker: Keith McQuirter, Decoder Media 
 
Description of Film:
 MILWAUKEE 53206 tells the story of those affected by mass incarceration in America’s most incarcerated ZIP code. Through the powerful journeys of Beverly Walker, Dennis Walton and Chad Wilson we witness how incarceration has shaped their lives, their families and their community. These intimate stories reveal how a community fights to move forward even as a majority of its young men end up in prison. The film examines how decades of poverty, unemployment, and a lack of opportunity has contributed to the crisis of mass incarceration in this community and communities across the nation.
 Trailer for "MILWAUKEE 53206"


Speakers
KM

Keith McQuirter

Director/Producer, Milwaukee 53206
Keith McQuirter is an award winning producer and director with credits in TV documentary, new media and commercials. He co-produced the five-part Peabody Award winning and Prime Time Emmy nominated docu-series Brick City for the Sundance Channel. Keith studied film and television... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Anne Faustin, Odyssey Networks

Anne Faustin, Odyssey Networks

Anne is the Director of Impact Campaigns at Odyssey Networks. She has over a decade of experience in strategic planning and development in both the private and non-profit sectors. She previously served as the Outreach Producer for Bring It to The Table a Talking Eyes Media documentary... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-F (2nd Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.17 Film Screening: My Brooklyn
Film Title: My Brooklyn
Name of Film Company: My Brooklyn Movie
Filmscreening Moderator: Allison Lirish Dean, My Brooklyn
 
Description of Film:
My Brooklyn follows director Kelly Anderson's journey, as a Brooklyn gentrifier, to understand the forces reshaping her neighborhood. The film documents the redevelopment of Fulton Mall, a bustling African-American and Caribbean commercial district that - despite its status as the third most profitable shopping area in New York City - is maligned for its inability to appeal to the affluent residents who have come to live around it. As a hundred small businesses are replaced by high rise luxury housing and chain retail, Anderson uncovers the web of global corporations, politicians and secretive public-private partnerships that drive seemingly natural neighborhood change. The film's ultimate question is increasingly relevant on a global scale: who has a right to live in cities and determine their future?

"A great pedagogical tool. It can't help but provoke informed discussion on the hot everyday issues of living in a changing city."
Peter Marcuse, Prof. of Urban Planning, Columbia University
Trailer for "My Brooklyn"



Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-D (2nd Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.18 Film Screening: Rubbertown
Film Title: Rubbertown
Independently Directed and Produced By: Remington Smith
Filmscreening Moderator: John Gilderbloom, Urban and Public Affairs, University of Louisville 

Description of Film:

Rubbertown is a neighborhood of heavy chemical industrial manufacturing plants in Louisville, KY near rubber manufacturing plants, a coal burning power plant and a toxic landfill site. It's also next to residential housing.  Due to the area's higher rates of cancer and chemical leaks, spills and odors, one woman tries to move her entire house to another county to escape Rubbertown.
Trailer for "Rubbertown"


Moderators


Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Greenway Ballroom-G (2nd Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.07 Mobility, Housing Needs & Tenure Choice
Perceived Housing Needs by Metropolitan Area Place Types
Kim Skobba, University of Georgia; Ann Ziebarth, University of Minnesota; Karen Tinsley, University of Georgia

Preferences vs Behavior: Investigation of the Decision Making of Individuals Purchasing a House
Richard Moye, Winston Salem State University

Access to Homeownership: Homebuying Intentions and Household Debt Among Low-Income Renters
Mark Lindblad, University of North Carolina -- Chapel Hill

Speakers
ML

Mark Lindblad

UNC-Chapel Hill Center for Community Capital

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Lakeshore C (1st Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.08 Immigrants' Experience in Global Cities
Governmentality of U.S. Welcoming Cities
Jeong Ahn, Arizona State University

Creating Global Cities of Refuge: Moonshot Innovation for Refugee Well-Being
Timothy Hagen , Epoka University

The Refugees’ Right to Housing: Producing Common Spaces in Athens
Charalampos Tsavdaroglou, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece)



Speakers
avatar for Charalampos Tsavdaroglou

Charalampos Tsavdaroglou

Aristotle University Thessaloniki, Aristotle University Thessaloniki

Moderators

Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Lakeshore B (1st Floor)

4:00pm

FR4.00.09 The Roots and Varieties of Political Activism
Cycling to Modernity: Russian Cycling Advocates Challenge the Century-long Tradition of Top-down Technocratic Planning
Asya Bidordinova, University of Toronto

Can Social Capital Facilitate Resident Engagement in Coproduction Activities?
Gary Anderson, University of North Carolina at Pembroke

"Ferguson" and the Invention of Civil Disorder in Western Societies
Daniel Monti, Saint Louis University

Speakers
avatar for Asya Bidordinova

Asya Bidordinova

PhD Candidate Planning, University of Toronto, Department of Geography and Planning
DM

Daniel Monti

Saint louis University
GA

Gary Anderson, University of North Carolina at Pembroke

University of North Carolina at Pembroke

Moderators
GA

Gary Anderson, University of North Carolina at Pembroke

University of North Carolina at Pembroke

Friday April 21, 2017 4:00pm - 5:25pm
Lakeshore A (1st Floor)

6:00pm

7:00pm

Friday - Dinner (on your own)
For options, visit the Concierge Desk or view tourist guides.

Friday April 21, 2017 7:00pm - 10:00pm
TBA
 
Saturday, April 22
 

8:00am

8:00am

8:00am

Cornell University Press (Discounts on urban studies titles and more!)
Meet Sr. Editor Michael McGandy at the Cornell University Press tables and get exclusive UAA discounts on our fantastic urban studies titles. Download our PDF flyer for more information!
 
Follow Michael McGandy on Twitter @michaelmcgandy
Follow Cornell Press on Twitter @CornellPress
http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 12:30pm
Mirage (2nd Floor)

8:00am

8:59am

9:00am

SA9.00.01 Questions of Equity in Mobility
Mobility Matters: Investigating the Link between Public Transportation and Income Equality in Major U.S. Cities
Ann Carpenter, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta; Alex Karner, Georgia Institute of Technology; Richard Duckworth, Georgia Institute of Technology

Bike Share Equity: A Survey of Residents in Low-Income and Minority Neighborhoods with Bike Share in Brooklyn, Chicago, and Philadelphia
Steven Howland, Portland State University;  Joe Broach, Portland State University; Nathan McNeil, Portland State University; Jennifer Dill, Portland State University; John MacArthur, Portland State University

Gentrification and Displacement in Los Angeles’ Rail Transit Neighborhoods
David Roachford, University of Southern California

Equity, Urban Transport, and the Future of City-Making
Diane Davis, Harvard Graduate School of Design; Lily Song, Harvard Graduate School of Design



Speakers
avatar for Ann Carpenter, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Ann Carpenter, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Senior Comm Dev Advisor, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
SH

Steven Howland

Portland State University

Moderators
avatar for Ann Carpenter, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Ann Carpenter, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Senior Comm Dev Advisor, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Saturday April 22, 2017 9:00am - 10:25am
Greenway Ballroom-B (2nd Floor)

9:00am

SA9.00.04 The Politics of Placemaking and Urban Dynamics
Pakistan: Gwadar City in the Making; How would it look like?
Muhammad Naveed Iftikhar, University of Delaware, USA; Muhammad Nadeem Javaid, Planning Commission, Government of Pakistan, Islamabad

Re-inventing Urban Public Spaces in Palestine
May Sayrafi, Birzeit University

Confronting Uber: Municipal Policy Responses to Disruptive Technology
Zachary Spicer, Brock University; Gabriel Eidelman, University of Toronto

Speakers
avatar for Naveed Iftikhar

Naveed Iftikhar

PhD Student, University of Delaware
I have worked with public, academic and international development organizations in the areas of public policy, governance, economic reforms, private sector development and sustainable energy. My current research focuses on entrepreneurship, cities, and public sector governance... Read More →

Moderators

Saturday April 22, 2017 9:00am - 10:25am
Greenway Ballroom-C (2nd Floor)

9:00am

SA9.00.05 Transit Development, Land Values and Urban Form
Measuring the Effect of Light-rail Construction on Land Prices in the City of Guadalajara, México
Eugenio Arriaga, Universidad de Guadalajara

Urban Scale, Spatial Form, and the Provision of Public Transit in US Metropolitan Areas
Shengnan Lou, University of Minnesota; Zhirong Zhao, University of Minnesota

The Effect of Rail Intra-urban Transit Stations on Neighborhood Change
Christopher Wyczalkowski, Georgia State University and Georgia Institute of Technology

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Wyczalkowski

Christopher Wyczalkowski

Doctoral Student, Georgia State University/Georgia Institute of Technology

Moderators
avatar for Kimberley Johnson, Barnard College

Kimberley Johnson, Barnard College

Director, Barnard-Columbia Urban Studies Program, Barnard College, Columbia Universty

Saturday April 22, 2017 9:00am - 10:25am
Greenway Ballroom-D (2nd Floor)

9:00am

SA9.00.07 Fostering Sustainability through Official Plans and Policies
Targets, Implementation and Outcomes: An Evaluation of America’s State Level Climate Action Plans
Serena Alexander, San Jose State University

Local Sustainability Initiatives: An Exploratory Trend Analysis
Christopher Hawkins, University of Central Florida; Rachel Krause, University of Kansas; Richard Feiock, Florida State University

Green Cures for Urban Ills: Environmental Sustainability and Community Change
Tony Reames, University of Michigan

Speakers
CH

Christopher Hawkins

University of Central Florida
avatar for Tony Reames, University of Michigan

Tony Reames, University of Michigan

Assistant Professor, University of Michigan

Moderators
avatar for Tony Reames, University of Michigan

Tony Reames, University of Michigan

Assistant Professor, University of Michigan

Saturday April 22, 2017 9:00am - 10:25am
Greenway Ballroom-J (2nd Floor)

9:00am

SA9.00.08 Advancing Urban Analysis: Methods and Mapping II
Improving Urban Analytics and Policy Development with Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs)
Tony Grubesic, Arizona State University; Jake Nelson, Arizona State University; Alyssa Chamberlain, Arizona State University; Danielle Wallace, Arizona State University

Methodological Approach to Develop a Comprehensive Geospatial Dimension Analysis of Active Built Environment
Soowoong Noh, University of Florida

A Spatial Simulation of Informal Settlements Relocation in a Real World Situation: Visualizing and Exploring Migration Patterns in Brazilian Amazon
Yicong Yang, Cornell University

Speakers
SN

Soowoong Noh

University of Florida

Moderators

Saturday April 22, 2017 9:00am - 10:25am
Greenway Ballroom-F (2nd Floor)

9:00am

SA9.00.09 Public Participation in Government: Concepts, Tools, and Tactics
Social Media as a Tool for Public Engagement in City Government…or Not
Ann O'M. Bowman, Texas A&M University; Domonic Bearfield, Texas A&M University

A Seat at the Table?: The Role of Client Participation in Nonprofit Governance
Cara Robinson, Tennessee State University

The Meaning of Racial Equity in Collaborative Governance: The Case of a Home for Everyone
Marisa Zapata, Portland State University

Speakers
avatar for Cara Robinson

Cara Robinson

Tennessee State University
MZ

Marisa Zapata

Assoc Prof/Director, Portalnd State University

Moderators

Saturday April 22, 2017 9:00am - 10:25am
Greenway Ballroom-G (2nd Floor)

9:00am

SA9.00.12 Ethnic (In)Tolerance and immigration
Understanding Public Attitudes Toward Immigration Policy: Ideological Politics, Self-Interest, and Political Knowledge
Tianshu Zhao, University of Illinois at Chicago; Timothy Johnson, University of Illinois at Chicago

Tolerance of Muslims in the US: Case Study of Attitudes Toward New Mosques in Chicago Area
Eliska Schnabel, University of Illinois at Chicago

Inter-Ethnic Experiences of Polish Immigrants in Neighborhoods of Small Towns and Large Cities in Spain
Dawid Wladyka, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley


Saturday April 22, 2017 9:00am - 10:25am
Greenway Ballroom-H (2nd Floor)

9:00am

SA9.00.13 Interventions to Assist At-Risk Populations
A Revolving Door to the Streets?: Exploring Urban Youths’ Perceptions of a Recreation Center in Atlanta, Georgia
Cameron Herman, Michigan State University

Shaping Perceptions of Homelessness: The Role of a Service-Learning Experience
Anaid Yerena, University of Washington Tacoma

Sport for Development and Peace in the Urban Global South – A Study of 36 SDP Organizations
Solveig Straume, Molde University College

The Efficacy of a Trauma-Informed Methodology for a Nonprofit Youth Organization in Camden, New Jersey
Natasha O. Fletcher, Rutgers University; Asia N. King, Rutgers University


Social Justice in an Olympic City after the Games: Violence, Risk and Vulnerability in Two Favelas of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Rachel Coutinho-Silva, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

Speakers
avatar for Cameron Herman

Cameron Herman

PhD Candidate, Michigan State University
RC

Rachel Coutinho-Silva, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro

Associate Professor, Graduate Program in Urbanism, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
avatar for Solveig Straume

Solveig Straume

Associate Professor, Molde University College
avatar for Anaid Yerena

Anaid Yerena

University of Washington Tacoma

Moderators
avatar for Anaid Yerena

Anaid Yerena

University of Washington Tacoma

Saturday April 22, 2017 9:00am - 10:25am
Greenway Ballroom-I (2nd Floor)

9:00am

SA9.00.14 Gentrification, Displacement and Communities
High Ground, Low Ground: The New Racial Topographies of Urban Development in the 21st Century
Anna Livia Brand, University of New Orleans

Politics of Erasure in Detroit: Rethinking Gentrification’s “Displacement” in the Context of Urban Decline
Michael Brown, Michigan State University and Drexel University; Claire W. Herbert, Drexel University

Segregation and Gentrification in Fredericksburg, VA: A Preservation Perspective
Andrea Livi Smith, University of Mary Washington; Christine Henry, University of Mary Washington

Gentrified Juries: A Study of Felony Convictions by Jury Trials in Gentrifying Cities
Alexius Marcano, Rice University

Speakers
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Alexius Marcano

Research Fellow, Kinder Institute for Urban Research
AL

Andrea Livi Smith

University of Mary Washington

Moderators

Saturday April 22, 2017 9:00am - 10:25am
Greenway Ballroom-A (2nd Floor)

9:00am

SA9.00.15 Schooling and Inequality
High School Dropout: A Critical Study in Economically Disadvantaged Urban Areas
Gregory Cartwright, University of Texas at Arlington; Victoria Cartwright, University of Texas at Arlington

Examining School Openings and School Closures for Students and Communities
Megan Gallagher, The Urban Institute; Amanda Gold, The Urban Institute; Rolf Pendall, The Urban Institute

With a Little Help from Our Friends: Private Donors and Public Schools in Philadelphia
Ryan M. Good, Rutgers University; Katharine Nelson, Rutgers University; James DeFilippis, Rutgers University

New Gentrifiers? The Socio-spatial Effects of Charter Schools in Los Angeles
Authors: Michael Lens, University of California Los Angeles; Brock Hicks, Calthorpe Analytics





Speakers